Summary:

The lines between homegrown and professionally funded content continue to get blurrier, so much so that the Journal has finally taken notice…

The lines between homegrown and professionally funded content continue to get blurrier, so much so that the Journal has finally taken notice. It reports on how reality shows are moving to the web and trying to take advantage of use-generated content. Many of the sites are amateur goofs: Google has nothing to do with “Google Idol” but welcomes the chance to promote Google Video). But some, such as “Gold Rush” (a joint project of AOL and reality-TV maker Mark Burnett, reported on here back in May) are deeper attempts to link TV shows and websites. Will people continue to watch when sponsors try harder to monetize the online video? Elsewhere in the piece, ad executives note that online video has ad-skipping worries of its own. Although there are no TiVo-like systems for fast-forwarding through the preroll ads that precede many online videos (at least not yet), there is not yet consensus whether preroll videos work. AOL limits its prerolls to 15 seconds, an executive at Omnicom worries about prerolls being ignored, and Yahoo’s chief sales officer, Wenda Harris Millard, predicts, “I don’t think this will be the majority of video advertising online, by far.”

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