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Summary:

MySpace is worth $15 billion, says HB 2.0. Okay if that is the case, then a new social network concept by MySpace employee number 5 has to be worth at least $4-to-$5 million in venture capital dollars. Jason Feffer, former vice presidents of operations at MySpace […]

MySpace is worth $15 billion, says HB 2.0. Okay if that is the case, then a new social network concept by MySpace employee number 5 has to be worth at least $4-to-$5 million in venture capital dollars. Jason Feffer, former vice presidents of operations at MySpace is close to snagging funding from Mohr Davidow Ventures for his new company, SodaHead.

Sources in Silicon Valley say that this social network is targeting grown ups who want to have grown up conversations about like price of natural gas or war in Iraq. The buzzword is – social wisdom.

Call me crazy, but isn’t that what blogs are for! Anyway, we should expect more XMySpaceR to jump ship, and cash in on MySpace-craze. On SodaHead, we have heard that the company cannot hire from MySpace because of non-compete agreements. By the way 53% of those who voted in a previous poll think that the social networking madness has got to stop.

  1. What kind of marketing is it to name a service targeted at grownups SodaHead? Google and Yahoo are goofy but also easily translatable into verbs. Who would and how would they SodaHead?

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  2. MetroProper, i can’t wait=)

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  3. Sodahead? Seriously? This idea is getting millions in funding?

    Yunno, in the midwest, Soda is called pop. You know, POP… as in “what a bubble does…”

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  4. Yeah, first Wallop comes wallowing along – limping along – and now SodaPop? I agree with the last comment about POP is what a bubble does. I can’t believe there are people (VC types) that want to dump millions into something for adults that want to discuss “Iraq” and “stock prices” called – SodaPop.

    Lame.

    Rex

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  5. Social networking for adults targeted at fun and good conversation sounds like a blast to me. Now i won’t have to weed through the teenie boppers on MySpace.

    GO SODAHEAD!!!!

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  6. I know that some of these social networks that are coming out don’t have great overall concepts… BUT social networking is here to stay for two reasons:

    1. Social Networking makes everything on the internet more relevant to you.
    2. It fills the basic human need to communicate with others.

    I wrote an entire blog post on it here:

    http://www.socialdegree.com/2006/09/28/why-social-networking-is-here-to-stay/

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  7. Sodahead, crackhead, pothead–what’s next? Seriously, i agree with your point, Om. Social wisdom could readily be discussed via personal blogs.

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  8. A social network for adults [parents of myspacers] definitely has a place; that’s why we built http://www.faces.com – which is the best place to share your whole digital life in a mature, neat environment 

    I personally think more is needed than just a blog. Most people have more to share than just their words, sharing their digital life such as video, photos, music and favorites is important too. I like to have everything in one neat site, it makes it easy to share, my friends know where everything is and I can maintain it easily too.

    I do wonder about naming something for adults sodahead though.

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  9. SodaHead? WTF does that mean? haha
    I think all this myspace stuff is just a fad like friendster and hotornot and the others…there will always be something bigger and better to come along but I dont think its sodahead…

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  10. The silly name and ho-um idea are not that surprising. I used to work with this guy at Intermix (where I still work). He was generally regarded as something of a joke.

    Contrary to the spin he was not one of the myspace founders. He was an ad traficker from Intermix that Intermix managers assigned to run ads on myspace. He got no equity, nor did he participate in the bonus that the founders got from News Corp. That is why he can leave now and the real founders are still locked in.

    He was pretty good at paying attention to detail, but overall I’d have to say he was generally regarded as being pretty clueless (hence the name sodahead for a grown up site).

    Kudos to him for trying to cash in on the myspace hype though. I’m surprised Mohr didn’t dig more into his background? The team there look like a bunch of enterprise software guys, which may explain their lack of understanding of this market.

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