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Summary:

Barry Doyle has a listing of three recommended Tablet PC books, two of which can be had for less than a Grande Latte at Starbucks! "Tablet PCs for Dummies" and "Tablet PC Quick Reference" are the ‘low on cost, but high on value’ list. Michael Linenberger’s […]

Seize_the_work_day_3Barry Doyle has a listing of three recommended Tablet PC books, two of which can be had for less than a Grande Latte at Starbucks! "Tablet PCs for Dummies" and "Tablet PC Quick Reference" are the ‘low on cost, but high on value’ list. Michael Linenberger’s "Seize the Work Day: Using the Tablet PC to Take Total Control of Your Work and Meeting Day" rounds out the recommended reading and is actually the only book on my nightstand; in fact, I’ve been to some hotels and found this book IN the nightstand. Don’t ask which hotels I stay at…it’s better that you don’t know.

If I could add one or two books, they would be: "How to Do Everything with your Tablet PC" and "Microsoft Office OneNote 2003 for Windows". Although OneNote doesn’t require a Tablet PC for usage, it really shines on a tablet; additionally, Todd Carter (the author) and I used to write together for PVRWire. Todd’s a solid writer and I think you’ll find his style very usable. What books would you add?

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  1. “Seize the Work Day: Using the Tablet PC to Take Total Control of Your Work and Meeting Day” is an absolute “must read” if you are new to tablet pcs. His book “Total Workday Control” (for using outlook) is also excellent. The two have change a great deal about the way in which I work.

  2. I’d add “Getting Things Done”, which has been an enormous help in coordinating OneNote, Outlook, and my PDA. When that Fujitsu 1610 makes it to market, maybe I can finally get away from using my phone as a PDA. We’ll see. It’s the whole syncing thing that really bites. Seize the Work Day was good – especially for newbies to the Tablet. But, when it comes to really organizing actions on the tablet (or otherwise), Getting Things Done is where it’s at imho.

  3. ‘Making sense of American slang’ is a must.
    What does ‘Grand Latte at Starbucks’ mean? Is it a reference to Battlestar Galactica? An American dollar bill?

    Seriously though, I’d like a book about Onenote 2007. This program is fantastic and I’m sure there’s so much more to it than I know.

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