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Summary:

I am in New York this week, for work, and mostly to get away from Silicon Valley. Between visits to art galleries, hanging out with friends over long wine infused dinners, I have to find time to work, and write and still be productive. I am […]

I am in New York this week, for work, and mostly to get away from Silicon Valley. Between visits to art galleries, hanging out with friends over long wine infused dinners, I have to find time to work, and write and still be productive. I am finding that its not that easy. Working out of cafes in San Francisco, or roaming Silicon Valley is by now second nature.

New York, is proving to be tougher, mostly because of geographic dislocation. Unlike SF, I am not familiar with the WiFi zones. I spent most of the evening yesterday and today looking for WiFi connection because the Verzion EVDO Express Card stopped working for some odd reason. (Any tips on a quiet WiFi enabled cafe below 23rd street in Manhattan?) More than connectivity issues, I am finding that the new geolocation is not letting me get in the flow of things. Do you have any advice or tips for me? Have you experienced similar issues, or is just an “om issue.”

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  1. I definitely understand the geo(dis)location issue.

    As for the advice, I definitely recommend Panera Bread. When I was travelling, they were almost always there with hot (good) coffee, and free wifi.

    Another good resource is Google Maps. It is pretty smart in that you can search for stuff like ‘wifi near address’ and it will show you some hotspots near you. granted, you need internet for it, but i suggest using the evdo bootstrap yourself to faster internet.

  2. Hey, you may have luck with the nycwireless hotspot map. Also, I find myself over at Cafe Ari pretty often, near 8th st and 6th ave. Pretty hard to beat: free wireless, decent coffee, and always a seat, sometimes even a power outlet.

  3. I had an endlessly hard time getting into the flow of things in NYC. Perhaps it’s the odd energy of the city – SF is a city of love after all.

  4. I have never been to New York so I cannot speak precisely about that local but I have spent my fair share of time trying to work in places other than my city of residence. This may sound a little simple but:

    Find a table as close to a wall as you can. Sit facing toward the wall and use headphones.

    When we’re in a new environment our brains are doing everything they can to take in all the new sensory perceptions. It doesn’t take long to work out all the new visual information in a wall and if you use headphones you’ve effectively cut yourself off from all that new data.

    I am an almost compulsive people watcher, so if there’s a window or if I can see the counter of the coffee shop, etc, that’s going to be far more interesting to me than whatever I’m working unless I’m really enthusiastic about my task.

    I don’t know if it will work for you but I’ve gotten pretty good mileage out of. :)

    Best of Luck,
    Brian

  5. I have a hard time working in NYC. I live an hour north of NYC and find it pretty easy to get into a work groove at a cafe, wifi zoned or not. But in the City, I’m stumped.

    Maybe it’s the lack of trees.

  6. It’s just the new location. It can be jarring. I just came up to Philly to see my girlfriend from Florida. Philly has some nice free hotspots so it’s a breeze here but I did tend to have some problems (mentally) at first in the realm of getting mentally adjusted.

  7. TRY THIS LOCATION:

    Tea Spot, 127 Macdougal St. (at West 3rd), 212-832-7769: whatever people say, there is something nice about seeing people sitting in a cafe and taking their work (or their net surfing?) seriously. The laptop/wireless scene meets the tea scene, in this NYU area tea place. Wide selection of teas. Green tea brewed in too warm a temprature, but still is enjoyable. Once again, not the refinment of special traditional tea ware for different teas, not enough care in these details, but still a nice place. If you need to work, (or surf this forum) and have good tea – it’s a great option.

  8. This won’t be for everyone but, often before I travel, I’ll use Google Locals (aka Google Maps) to search for “free wifi” in the area. I then use a converter to transform those locations into waypoints, and send them to my GPS along with hotel info, etc.

  9. DEMO, Ning, GoogleTalk, dot MAC, Web 2.0 « Technically Speaking Wednesday, September 27, 2006

    [...] Over on his Web Worker Daily site, there is a nice article on working remote in NYC. [...]

  10. Have you considered Kinko’s? If you get the T-mobile hotspot thingy for forty bucks you can connect as much as you want for a month (jeez! I sound like I work for them!-I don’t!).

    You’ll part with forty clams but at least their open 24/7.

    Good luck!
    LivNLet

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