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Summary:

High speed cable and DSL connections are getting a bandwidth boost, along with per month bills. Verizon and Cablevision have both introduced consumer broadband packages with speeds in excess of 30 megabits per second, and have also boosted the upstream speeds. Even second tier cable providers […]

High speed cable and DSL connections are getting a bandwidth boost, along with per month bills. Verizon and Cablevision have both introduced consumer broadband packages with speeds in excess of 30 megabits per second, and have also boosted the upstream speeds. Even second tier cable providers like Charter are pushing cheaper, faster connections.

Charter is currently selling a 1o megabit per second connection for $60.47 a month. Our good buddy, Phil Harvey, a Charter subscriber, does some friday evening beer infused math and concludes that his price per megabit per month is around $6.04, down from a whopping $41.94 he was paying in September 2003. Now imagine if there was real competition.

Tell us, how much you are paying per megabit per month, and how does it stack up against what you were paying say three years ago. You can calculate this by using Harvey’s theorem: Divide your monthly bill by the speed being touted by your broadband provider.

  1. I pay about 1400/mbit/month. GO ISDN! :/

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  2. $435/mo for T1 (bit the bullet over ISDN or satellite)… so… 435/1.5 = $290 per megabit.

    And with Verizon’s loop prices on T1s going sky high (over 30% increase in the past 6 months and supposedly more coming), I expect our expenses to go UP, not down.

    You wanna know who’s paying for all those FiOS deployments?!? It’s all the business folks and suckers like me who are stuck w/ T1 service as their only choice for broadband. We’ll see FiOS type stuff here around the time William Shatner gets a believable hairpiece.

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  3. 1o Mbps -> 10Mbps

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  4. You have it good in the US. In Ireland, you pay EUR 30 for 1 MB download/256k up (41:1 contention) or EUR 40 for 2 MB download/512k up – with a 20:1 contention. The latter works out at EUR 20 per MB download – or USD 25.55 per MB.

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  5. Feels great to be living in the Netherlands. If you check this site http://www.bellen.com/ you can see the offers for both cable and DSL that are available in the Netherlands. (Zipcode is eg 2545AM) Lowest I could find quickly was 2 euro/mbit for Orange with a 20mbit DSL connection. That includes VoIP service. It goes up to like €10/mbit + voip day and night with using the incumbent KPN. In France IPTV is also included in the deal. Have a look at the websites of Free and France Telecom. Seems the Eurocrats made a good decision with their New Regulatory Framework for Telecoms and mandatory Unbundled Local Loop and/or Wholesale Broadband Access (/gloat)

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  6. I pay:

    $20 for 1GB Bandwidth/month, 4cents/Mb for additional usage. Free Usage at nights (12am-8pm).

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  7. “Verizon and Cablevision have both introduced consumer broadband packages with speeds in excess of 30 megabits per second”

    Where have they done this? In the 2 homes in the tri-state (NY,NJ,PA) served by FIOS? Until this is broadly available (which it is not) to a majority of customers statements like the one above are quite misleading.

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  8. Comcast: $14 in 2002 to $8.59 now. Thank god for competition – oh wait I have no other provider (DSL, FIOS or WiMAX).

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  9. funny, i just upgraded this week with RCN in boston – was paying 41 a month for 7megs down, 800k up, now paying 71 yes, 71 for 20megs down, 2megs up…however, multiple speed tests online show differing ups/downs, like 11down and 1.1 up etc..

    does ANYBODY know of a great and reliable online bandwidth speed test? i’ve been testing hardlined even though i often use the wifi, because i think hardline speed tests should be more accurate…

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  10. 24 Meg for £24 a month ($50) = $2MB. Plus I get 1.5MB up.

    Actually, I usually get anything between 8-18MB down, with 24 being the theoretical maximum… but you asked for the advertised amount.

    I’m not looking forward to coming to America on this front. My appartment in SF has fiber to the building, but it still only comes down to a 3-6MB connection per connection.

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