4 Comments

Summary:

Friendster might have taken some hits over the years, but the social network recently raised a new round of funding and has become surprisingly popular in the Philippines. Given that Filipino mobile users are some of the most avid text messagers in the world, it’s a […]

Friendster might have taken some hits over the years, but the social network recently raised a new round of funding and has become surprisingly popular in the Philippines. Given that Filipino mobile users are some of the most avid text messagers in the world, it’s a happy accident for Friendster that it is also starting to see some popularity with its early mobile service.

Friendster’s President Kent Lindstrom says Friendster’s text-message system in the Philippines already has 50,000 subscribers and the company has a beta web-to-SMS chat system, called MOBS, for Mobile Broadcast System, that will extend Friendster Mobile further in that country.

That’s still a small population compared to its online component, but mobile social networks are more easily monetized in the Philippines compared to other markets, says Lindstrom. Not so in the U.S., Europe and Canada, says Lindstrom, who says the company will only tackle these new markets through a partnership with a mobile company. Mobile isn’t exactly our forte, says Lindstrom, here we need a strong partner. Lindstrom says Friendster is starting the early phases of talks with companies that can help it mobilize on its home turf.

You hear that Valley mobile startups? If you’re working on mobile social networks you know who to call. (If you haven’t already.)

You’re subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings

  1. Impressive. Today i came across to a web service where i just store my mobile contacts and calendar for free, i like it coz that way my contacts are secure even if i loose my mobile

  2. Have you guys looked at PartySync (http://www.partysync.com)? I met them at a web 2.0 conference. They have an API to mobilize groups, i.e. to create mobile groups, picture messaging, text messaging etc.

    Plus they already have 35,000 users using their system.

  3. Zurna.com, the Turkish MySpace, also will be providing an SMS-based subscription service in the next month, where each member will pay 1-5 YTL(New Turkish Liras) per month, automatically billed to their cell phone. Credit card usage online is close to non-existant in Turkey, and a local alternative to Paypal still does not exist, so mobile billing seems to be more effective and cover a larger percentage of the population. I was glad to see another company move in this direction facing similar circumstances.

  4. Can anyone tell me how this is different from what MSN is doing with their Messenger to SMS app?

Comments have been disabled for this post