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Summary:

Holy Smokes – Amazon is offering computing on demand. They have a new service called Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) and the company page describes it as a “web service that provides resizable compute capacity in the cloud. It is designed to make web-scale computing […]

Holy Smokes – Amazon is offering computing on demand. They have a new service called Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) and the company page describes it as a “web service that provides resizable compute capacity in the cloud. It is designed to make web-scale computing easier for developers.” This in tandem with the Amazon storage service, S3, makes the cost of development for web-based applications even lower. More thoughts to follow…

  1. I went through the technical docs. I wonder how this will affect the virtual private server (VPS) industry – what are the average costs for EC2 + S3 combined? I haven’t done any computation, but one key advantage for EC2 is that you can turn off your “server” when you don’t need it.

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  2. I just did a quick run down of the cost on my head and seems comes to about 75 bucks (approx)to store 1 GB with 10 Gig transfer and have it up and running 24 hrs/day for 31 days.

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  3. So, Amazon has invented…the mainframe timeshare.

    Things go ’round and ’round and ’round…

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  4. so how much does that compare with some of the traditional offerings, Venkk.

    I am assuming the value of this is really when you are dealing with bursty traffic?

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  5. This kind of scalable computing resource is especially interesting to those creating small web services which may or may not take off. You have a bunch of things converging here — many new, small sites are getting done with frameworks like Ruby on Rails. These fameworks attack the problem of lowering initial development cost, while EC2 lowers initial hosting cost. Result? Much lower barriers to experiementation and market entry.

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  6. Om, the value is indeed the scalability. If I had a few servers at a traditional host/ISP and I had a slew of new business or got dugg, for example, I’d have to contact the ISP, have them set-up new boxes (a day or so of time and costly set-up fees) then configure them (another day), etc.

    With this new Amazon service, I can simply flip on a few new virtual servers which are mirrored versions of existing servers I’ve got up. And then shut them down when I no longer need them.

    Or, with their API, I can have my application automatically scale up and down based on loads.

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  7. “Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud”
    “Mechanical Turk”
    “Simple Storage Service”

    seriously, who is in charge of branding & naming over there?

    S3 ain’t bad for shorthand, but i’m sure my cat could do a better job of coming up with more memorable names.

    service sounds cool tho. amazon keeps pimping out the magic, other folks chase their tail… but seem to get broader adoption.

    i’ll say it again, Amazon would be an attractive acquisition for Microsoft or other parties with the cash. they’ve got a hell of a lot more innovation going on over there than their own eyeball traffic can ever monetize. what a waste.

    (ps – i don’t have a cat)

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  8. Wonder whether that was the reason why Amazon was down for a few hours during the beginning of the week.

    Having said that, I think, a primary concern would be security – they need to handle this tricky thing really well.

    – Thyaga

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  9. This is a repost. I posted this comment in the S3 post instead of posting it here (by mistake)

    Amazon is not in this to make stellar profits from on-demand-infrastructure. Commoditization of hardware will add to their margin, introduction of newer services to allay competition will eat at their margins, making this a balanced game of keeping customers at any cost.

    The bigger game, just like Google, is to have more customers use their infrastructure to pass/share their data, leading to better personalized services. That is where the end-goal resides.

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  10. I think the names are great. Reminds me of the dawn of personal computing. Back when Dr Dobbs was known as “Dr Dobbs Journal of Computer Calesthenics and Orthodontia”

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