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Summary:

I can’t take any credit away from Dave Winer; we all have much to thank him for today with his work on web and syndication technologies. I’ve been watching his site over the past few days as he’s working on the "river of news" concept now […]

Jk_mobileI can’t take any credit away from Dave Winer; we all have much to thank him for today with his work on web and syndication technologies. I’ve been watching his site over the past few days as he’s working on the "river of news" concept now that he has a Blackberry. Josh Bancroft points out astutely that mobile content aggregation is nothing new; I’d agree and I think that Dave is kicking tires right now as he demonstrates the mobile river with high profile sites. My guess is that Dave creates a new tool or platform that publishers can use to mobilize their content, even though there are already a few out there.

I’m curious how many folks read RSS content on phones, smartphones and other very mobile devices (meaning not full-fledged PCs). What aggregator is your fave? Do you like Dave’s view of the New York Times or do you prefer it in your aggregator? Oh and just for fun: what do you think of this mobile content: thanks to a tip from Josh, this is a Google formatted view of jkOnTheRun without images.

-kct

  1. CHeck out Webaroo, which i wrote about, let’s you use Windows Mobile 5.0 to search the web offline. http://www.ministryoftech.com/2006/08/22/latest-version-of-webaroo-launched/

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  2. Bloglines Mobile continues to be very fast, very efficient and available from anywhere you can get a simple browser running. Recommended.

    Steve.

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  3. Been reading RSS on a pocket pc since 2001 with PocketFeed. Nothing new to see here, as Josh states.

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  4. I’ve become a huge believer in RSS as the mobile web. RSS feeds (via Newsbreak on my HTC Universal) have replaced probably 80% of my web browsing (via PC or mobile). I kinda prefer just reading my feeds on my Uni, although occasionally I’ll fire up the Google reader to consume some feeds from the desktop. Am I the only one that isn’t a big fan of Google’s mobile-ized proxy? Having to load parts of each page separately is such a chore. I much prefer Mobile Leap ( http://mlvb.net/ ) as it is fast, retains the core URL, and lets you configure your own settings for image quality and more.

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  5. We developed FreeNews particularly to solve this problem so publishers don’t have to mobilize their content and yet I as a phone reader can read everything that I want. Lots of people have been using it a long time and are finding it quite useful, particularly if you read more than a few blogs or news sites. You can see more at http://www.freerangeinc.com/

    As you pointed out, there are lots of ways for publishers to make mobile versions of their content, but 90% of them don’t. It’s generally too far down the priority list. Content sites with RSS feeds represent a very large and ever growing subset of all sites, but sites that have taken the trouble to mobilize content is a very small and slowing growing subset. Taking RSS to mobile phones is ideal and something that has been talked about for a while: http://freerangeinc.com/Rangeblog/?p=14

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