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Summary:

InfoWorld reported that the prerelease version of Leopard handed out to developers at WWDC has been leaked to file sharing networks. It reportedly has all the features shown at the WWDC, including Spaces and Time Machine. Of course, this could also be a deliberate publicity stunt […]

InfoWorld reported that the prerelease version of Leopard handed out to developers at WWDC has been leaked to file sharing networks.

It reportedly has all the features shown at the WWDC, including Spaces and Time Machine.

Of course, this could also be a deliberate publicity stunt for Apple. This release most definitely does not have any of the secret features Jobs wouldn’t comment on at WWDC. It’s the release that was handed out on DVD at the WWDC, so Apple knew it could make its way onto file sharing networks eventually.

So what do you think? Was this some common sense-lacking developer who wants to get sued or Apple looking to build up some viral marketing prior to Leopard’s official release?

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  1. It’s quite buggy and has no upgrade path to the real Leopard, so I doubt Apple released it on purpose. They’ll probably go after whoever leaked it as quickly as they went after the folks who leaked Tiger last time around.

    I do have to say, though, the new features are pretty amazing and IMO the coolest stuff in it wasn’t even mentioned at WWDC. Numerous interface improvements to Safari and iChat… and Spotlight is much, much faster. Two thumbs up for leaks and Bittorrents :)

  2. Anddddd now Apple has a link to someone who has openly admitted to illegally downloading software! Good luck on not getting sued monitron! :)

  3. Aww, shucks. As far as I can tell, Apple has never sued users of leaked beta software, just the folks who leaked it in the first place.

    …and if I do get sued, I should be in good company, as there are loose lips all over the Internets:

    http://www.engadget.com/2006/08/15/leopard-running-free-across-the-internet/#comments

    http://impulsivehighlighters.blogspot.com/2006/08/leopard-preview-torrent-is-up.html

    …etc… :)

  4. Really Apple shouldn’t put a lot of legal effort into this. I mean, shock that your warez getz ownzed by the P2P networks.If you give your software out, chances are it will be copied, shared, and pirated. Secondly, Apple knows this is going to happen; the people who created these DVD’s know that people will spend three days downloading it from Bittorrent. If it was the gold master with the super secret features included then I could see a problem.

    Frankly, I wish the software industry would forgo desktop apps and focus on building web enabled languages that act like desktop apps. You can’t steal a web app server…

  5. This is certainly an NDA-breaking developer and not Apple.

  6. Todd – there’s still the point that someone is supposed to be under NDA to get one of these things – it’s not quite the same as cracking shrink-wrapped software.
    It’s also not as if it’s useful – anyone who would want to run Leopard on their machine this early should almost certainly be on the Mac developers program already – it pays for itself in hardware discount anyway.

    >Frankly, I wish the software industry would forgo desktop apps and focus on building web >enabled languages that act like desktop apps. You can’t steal a web app server…

    The point of a desktop framework – like Cocoa or .NET – is to ensure a lot of consistency and interoperability between your apps. Web apps may be increasingly offering desktop style interfaces, but in terms of the way they link together, you’re right back in the mid 80s. Solving that problem is going to be a huge endeavour. How about, and call be a crazy radical, having client programs that run on the desktop but have servers for storing data, synchronisation and collaboration. We could call this model ‘client-server’ and it would be about using resources in an appropriate way (i.e. not using the server to render a page into HTML to deliver to an underutilised client).

  7. Don’t do it! Leopard is FAR from done. The developer release contains only some of the new features, and some of them AREN’T WORKING right. If you download leopard, BACKUP your computer first, and for gods sake – don’t overwrite your existing version of the OS! Apple isn’t releasing leopard until fall of 2007, and its for a good reason. Beta versions of the OS are always leaked it seems, and the general public is bound to get totally screwed installing them.

  8. Jules,

    It is going to be a huge endevour; that’s why I started my company. I don’t know if I’ll succeed, but I am certainly going to try and bring a new way of doing things to this industry. There isn’t too much to complain about using frameworks versus the old way of repeating code (I don’t profess to be a programmer). I just think we’re doing it all wrong.

    I do agree with you re: the NDA issue. It doesn’t make it right that software is leaked and downloaded like it is. My point is that, in our current technology model, that there is virtually nothing that can be done to prevent it. For this to be a shock to the Mac community is more a statement of moral regard within us over the simple act of it occuring.

  9. I would have thought Apple would be more interested in going after the person that leaked it (assuming they did’nt leak it) onto the filesharing networks and the networks themselves rather than an individual who puts it on his Mac just to see how cool the new features are, I reckon 90% of all the people I know would download it to check it out as we’re all crazy about our Macs.

    I never buy shrinkwrapped copies of Mac OS X as I don’t keep a Mac long enough to bother and I’ll get Leopard installed on a new iMac Core Due at some point. I’ll be downloading it as soon as I have time and motivation enough to try on my MacBook Pro, and I couldn’t give a damm if Apple find out or not. I buy a lot of hardware from them, if they want to alienate me to PC & Linux, go ahead and sue me, I’ll take a few more of they’re customers with me when I go.

    Attacking the downloaders is going to achieve nothing, considering the revenue of the computer giants (Intel & M$ etc) and the profit they must make, it seems silly to me that they still can’t get they’re shit together and stop pirating from happening. Much the same as ripping and burning movie DVD’s, the encrption mechanism was cracked by a 16 year old Finnish student, who’s fault is that the student, the guy that pirates it or the so called scientists, mathmaticians & software engineers that get paid serious money to prevent this from happening and fail totally.

    I’m not saying I condone pirating, but it’s not exactly like they make it hard it is?

  10. Has anyone who’s downloaded the leak tried installing on a G3? I’m pretty sure they won’t be supported but was just curious.

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