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Summary:

Airport, Leopard, Boot Camp, Bonjour. These are just a sampling of the many terms that Apple has used for different pieces of technology that they offer the world. These everyday terms have a way of seeping into our consciousness that we may not realize. It’s the […]

Airport, Leopard, Boot Camp, Bonjour. These are just a sampling of the many terms that Apple has used for different pieces of technology that they offer the world. These everyday terms have a way of seeping into our consciousness that we may not realize. It’s the new subliminal marketing. Think about it.

My collection of RSS feeds is lengthy and varied in topic. Yet as I go through the general list, I find that my brain automatically flags feed items that contain these and many of Apple’s other terms. Maybe half the time they’re related to the Cupertino computer company, while the rest of the time it’s something else (like a place where airplanes land, a zoo, the military, or France…).

Maybe this is just me. Too much Mac on the brain I suppose. But I think it’s hard to deny the logic in some of the naming schemes that Apple uses. (But still, the MacBook?) Pay attention to that fleeting moment next time – is there a quick flash of an apple with a bite out of it before logic kicks in? Or have I had a bit too much of the Kool-aid to drink…?

  1. When I hear “airport”, I think of both Apple and the actual airport (because I like to travel). Bootcamp goes with the military because my ex is a Marine. Leopard and Bonjour both go straight to Apple. Just like if I hear the word “pod”, I immediately think iPod.

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  2. I think that they are using more Mac in the naming of Apple products because more people are linking common things to Apple and some people don’t actually know that Mac OS is the name of Apple’s operating system.

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  3. Not really on topic, but I didn’t know where else to go.

    I’ve really enjoyed this site recently since I came upon it. Believe me, I’m in no one’s league with Mac’s. I got an iBook a little over a year ago (much to the chagrin of my father, who had built my PC desktops for 12-15 years), and I use it for the basics: word processing, surfing the Web, playing with digital photos, and of course, interacting with my iPod. I am having one rediculously simple problem that my sleeply state of my is keeping me from figuring it out. I tried to update to Quicktime Pro from Quicktime 7. I know I was charged, but the registration key that was provided in the confirmation e-mail, came back invalid whenever I try to enter it. Is this a common occurrence? Do I just have to call Apple and get a new key? Or, do I have to eat the $30? Any info would be appreciated. Thanks.

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  4. Jason, you should contact Apple and ask them what to do. There’s no way you should eat the $30. And I’ve bought a lot of software over the web but have never heard of an invalid registration code, from Apple or anyone else, so your situation is very rare.

    When you write to Apple, make sure you include the contents of the email you received.

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  5. Yep, I just spent 35 minutes getting transferred around, waiting on help. Then they gave me a number for Quicktime that was disconnected. I love my Mac, but this is driving me up the wall.

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  6. Jason,
    I’m sure you’ve already tried this, but make sure you’re copying/pasting the name/code from the email exactly (no spaces, etc) as it can be picky. Then just tab away from the field to make it register.

    Just covering bases, in case it’s some stupid little gotcha like that. I recall having some small issue like one of the above that caught me off guard at first, long ago when I got QT pro.

    good luck!

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  7. Thanks for the suggestions. It turned out the key I was given was for Windows, not for OSX. Once we figured that out, it was smooth sailing.

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  8. You’re right in that it’s marketing…but it’s not a new thing at all. All the most careful marketers choose their words with utmost care, and many design them to appeal to your most basic human response functions. I don’t know whether or not to say it’s a case of deliberate subliminal messaging, because hey, they have to choose SOME kind of word for it right? I personally hate marketing as a concept, but as far as letting it invade my conscious goes, I think there’s a simple solution – just train yourself to be aware of ALL the marketing messages you recieve, so you know you can seperate yourself from then, should you wish. It’s either that or live in the mountains, I’m afraid!

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