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Summary:

This Lifehacker post about encrypting text on your website using Javascript reminded me of some little known OS X-only software that I use on my websites. Email Encoder from Closenit Sofware is a free and brilliant little app that weighs in at all of 68k. The […]

This Lifehacker post about encrypting text on your website using Javascript reminded me of some little known OS X-only software that I use on my websites.

Email Encoder from Closenit Sofware is a free and brilliant little app that weighs in at all of 68k. The basic idea is that you input your email address and the link text into Email Encoder and it spits out some seemingly random characters that you paste into your webpage/blog/whatever you post online that you don’t want spambots harvesting your email from. To a bot, you get something like this:

username@d

But when you click on the address, your email client pops up and the address is there just like a normal email link.

Now that is useful javascripted text encryption, only on your mac.

  1. maury mccown at RailHeadDesign has a neat simple tool for this too, SpamStopper. Check it at

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  2. Or, use the orginal Enkoder that’s been around for years. It has a web based version and a Mac os x 10.3 (or higher) version from Automatic Labs. http://automaticlabs.com/products/enkoder

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  3. Similar to what the good folks at Project Honeypot suggest, except with the convenience of residing on your Mac – nice.

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  4. You’ve confused me. I always thought that the problem was having a clickable link for an email address, not what it looks like (?).

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  5. Rick: This is only for when a spam-bot tries to “scrape” your email address from a webpage. The bot will only get the random characters but a human gets the real address.

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  6. [...] My first theAppleBlog.com post has gone up. It’s a little tid bit inspired by the lifehacker.com blog about encrypting text on your website. The lifehacker.com crew couldn’t figure out a useful reason to do it so I pointed one out and then pointed out some good OS X software to do it with. [...]

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  7. Why can’t spambots just incorporate this into their own algorithms?

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  8. TheBobs:They could. They could also incorporate “[at]” or “_at_” or “at” or whatever into their own algorithms. There’s not really a fool proof way to do it, I guess you could write some sort of pgp/blowfish/md5/etc. based, unbreakable, javascripted thing, but these seem to do the trick. The ones linked to also work great. I’ve used Enkoder and SpamStopper also, both work great. but NOTHING is fool proof.

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  9. Hmm, but what about the poor devils who browse withouot javascript eh? Screen-readers and such.

    Contact forms would seem to be the better answer to the spam issue.

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  10. Hm, actually, the parser for the blog software automatically parsed the entities above, :-) so the code one-liners appear wrong. Anyway…

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