Summary:

Of course, everyone wants to know how to win the mobile TV war, but the answers not going to be known until the war is actually won. Still,…

Of course, everyone wants to know how to win the mobile TV war, but the answers not going to be known until the war is actually won. Still, this in-depth article based on a “media gathering” by the DVB-H crowd for the World Cup demo has some interesting tidbits…
The US market is looked at, with Modeo’s network seen as having trouble because its spectrum, 1.67 GHz, isn’t likely to be used anywhere else in the world — which would reduce a lot of the benefits gained from the open standards. The other DVB-H crowd, HiWire, has better spectrum but apparently no-one thinks it actually wants to roll out a network. “A conspiracy theory was doing the rounds at this German event that Cingular is holding all the DVB-H players to ransom, trying to force Modeo to vacate its own 1.67 MHz spectrum and throw its lot in with HiWire. This is fuelled not least by the fact that no one present truly believes that HiWire is in the business of building out its own network…One thing this would allow, and we have said this in the past, is that Verizon could work with both Qualcomm and with DVB-H, on the same handsets, with slightly different software. That way Verizon could back ALL the horses in the race at once, and be sure to be riding a winner…Such a position would be sure to hurry Cingular into signing up its own “exclusive” deal with DVB-H providers, to ensure that such a Verizon eventuality did not occur.”
There’s also a lot on the UK market, which is unique in having the most number of technologies being trialed, mostly by BSkyB…

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