Summary:

Two new services run by an Australian (who doesn’t want to give CNET’s Daniel Terdiman his last name) allow users to find and use copyrighte…

Two new services run by an Australian (who doesn’t want to give CNET’s Daniel Terdiman his last name) allow users to find and use copyrighted content posted on viral video sites like YouTube and Google Video by non-copyright holders. One makes it possible to download content — including the stream-only material on YouTube.
Peekvid indexes and aggregates copyrighted material, including unauthorized uploads. It isn’t breaking any YouTube rules because it points to content on the site. While it gives users a way to find the content, it also makes it easier for copyright holders — and the viral video sites — to see what’s being posted without authorization. Links to episodes of Lost on YouTube lead to a message that the video is no longer available. Links to World Cup video are still active. YouTube’s Julie Supan told CNET they would use the site to check that the videos being hosted are legit: “A lot of these links are going to be dead soon, that’s for sure.”
Keepvid allows direct download from a host of sites, including stream-only sites like YouTube. Viewing requires a special player. In other words, it’s providing a disruptive service based on a disruptive service. One of Keepvid’s keepers — Joshua — said the best way to respond to his services and others would be “to enable downloading from their site.”

Comments have been disabled for this post