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Summary:

I gave a speech today on the pros and cons of Apple against Windows Computers, and I discussed how one of the misconceptions that I’ve seen about Macs is that you can’t game on them. This of course is entirely untrue; but for some reason, many […]

I gave a speech today on the pros and cons of Apple against Windows Computers, and I discussed how one of the misconceptions that I’ve seen about Macs is that you can’t game on them. This of course is entirely untrue; but for some reason, many people don’t beleive you can game on a Mac. While thinking about this, and writing my speaking notes and what not, I had a thought. The thought was an entirely Mac gaming cafe. There is a gaming cafe near my house. It has free wireless, gaming, consoles, movies, coffee, the works (thecyberlan.com). Well I was thinking of how great it would be if there was a gaming cafe that ran entirely on say, Apple G5’s. These computers would easily run games like Halo, Battlefield, WOW, and Call of Duty. I regularly run, and see these games played on Powerbook G4’s with no problem, there is no reason they wouldn’t run on G5’s. The only problems with games is that most have to be purchased directly from an Apple store, and some like Counterstrike could not be played at all. But that is where Bootcamp would come into play.

The gaming cafe I attend runs on Windows PC’s with a program called “Smartlaunch” to manage user accounts, money, and time. Well, I can understand why they would want to use a software like this; Windows is fairly easy to mess up. I’m sure that there is software like this available for OS X , but I beleive you could run a Mac gaming cafe straight off of the operating system. Simply use a program like the Apple stores currently have to launch their Genius Bar software and things. Of course you would want to run a Smartlaunch type software, but in theory you could run it straight from the OS with minimal problems. It would have all the innovations of a regular gaming cafe, only the PC’s would be replaced wtih Macs. So the question is, how hard would it be to run an all Mac gaming cafe, and how well would it do?

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  1. “I discussed how one of the misconceptions that I’ve seen about Macs is that you can’t game on them. This of course is entirely untrue; but for some reason, many people don’t beleive you can game on a Mac.”

    serious?

    No misconceptions here. You CAN’T game on a mac. But I’ve never heard anyone put the blame on the performance. The thing is there are, lets see, counting the games you mentioned. Plus add a few, what….2 games for mac’s?

  2. I left the PC world for the Mac world so that I could game. With all the Windows problems with which version of DirectX or Direct3D, graphic cards that didn’t work with the OS, drivers that would work with some games but not with others, memory holes sucking away all my computer’s memory until the game would come to a grinding halt, bad sound, no sound, and all the time, time, time I spent just trying to get all my games to work without glitching up some other game I had installed. I’d had enough. And I’ll never go back. The Mac OS gaming world is a sweet one. I have over a 150 great games from old-school to state of the art 1st person shooters, like Quake 4. They all installed perfectly the first time, ran perfectly, and play nice together.

    I think the all Mac gaming cafe would be a smart business to get into.

  3. Dan, knowing that your statement of there only being 2 games for macs is obviously an exaggeration…it’s still wrong. Ever checked out Aspyr? I just went to the Mac section of their site and did a rough count of over 120 games…and that’s just one company. Plus, those games are a large percentage of some of the major games out there. Also, “The Game Room” over at Macworld would also suggest there is a lot more going on with gaming in the Mac area than you seem to think.

    So before you start making exaggerated claims, it might be a good idea to do a bit of research.

  4. When I switched to Mac, I stopped gaming. Now, don’t get me wrong, Mac’s certainly have the power, but anyone who says there is a sufficient selection of games for the Mac is fooling themselves. The fact is its just not cost effective for developers to make the effort of porting games over to OS X. Yes, there are SOME games for Mac, but compared to the PC gaming arena, they are few and far-between. Us Mac users usually have to wait a year or so for a port, if we’re lucky enough that the game we want DOES end up being ported. The switch to the x86 architecture is a boon for Mac gaming. Boot Camp only re-enforces this. Before the release of Boot Camp, i was perfectly happy with my PowerBook, but now there is a light at the end of the gaming tunnel, and it is the Mac Book Pro. Now, developers really have no reason at all to port games to OS X, and I’m OK with that.

    Also, the decision to set up a gaming cafe is most certainly NOT good business sense. In the past 5 years, I have seen 3 different cafe’s open, and be forced to close due to lack of business. It’s simply a concept that bleeds money; constantly upgrading hardware to play the new games, licensing the new games, paying for bandwidth and utility bills, rent. All that, and the most people will ever pay is MAYBE $6-7 an hour.

  5. Tanner Morrison Thursday, April 20, 2006

    “Also, the decision to set up a gaming cafe is most certainly NOT good business sense. In the past 5 years, I have seen 3 different cafe’s open, and be forced to close due to lack of business. It’s simply a concept that bleeds money; constantly upgrading hardware to play the new games, licensing the new games, paying for bandwidth and utility bills, rent. All that, and the most people will ever pay is MAYBE $6-7 an hour. ”

    The Cyberlan Cafe that I live near has been open near 4 years now, and is in no danger at all of being shut down. I am close wtih the owners, and I know for a fact that they are doing very well.

    I agree that Mac games are no where near the selection of Windows games. But lets go to the nearest Circuit City and look at PC games, woo…it’s 4 different types of deer hunting games, oh man 7 different types of non-successful FPS and RPG games. Mac may not have as large of a selection, but it’s quality over quanity. They get the good games, I seriously doubt you’ll ever see someone playing Deer Hunt 4000 on a Mac.

  6. You’re not taking into account the good games that macs aren’t getting, or aren’t getting until years later.

    Let’s take a look at Gamespot’s current top 10:

    1 Civilization IV score:9.4
    2 The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion score:9.3
    3 Battlefield 2 score:9.3
    4 Guild Wars score:9.2
    5 F.E.A.R. score:9.1
    6 Galactic Civilizations II: Dread Lords score:9.0
    7 Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas score:9.0
    8 FIFA 06 score:8.9
    9 Tiger Woods PGA Tour 06 score:8.9
    10 Falcon 4.0: Allied Force score:8.9

    I don’t see any of those in the Apple store.

    And I’ll have you know that Oblivion is the best deer hunting game I’ve ever played ;)

  7. @justin, you did exactly what I was too lazy to do, thanks for backing up the argument.

    @Tanner, first, a belated welcome to the TAB team. Secondly, I guess it depends on location and demographic of the city. I’ve been close with the owners of the ones that closed down, so I too knew the ins and outs.

  8. Dear Josh,

    Go look at the pc games section at best buy.
    I’m assuming you already have, well so have I.
    I spent nearly 30 minutes looking for mac games, know what i found?
    1 game, know what that game was?
    Yup, you guessed it, WoW. Best selling game in the history of the world, or something right?
    Know what else? It comes ready for pc and macs.
    1 game out of hundreds, no exaggeration here.
    So while you go find websites that scrape the bottoms of the ocean for mac titles from 96′. I’ll be playing with my motion sensor and nanosaur 2.

  9. You all know that the gaming argument became moot when Apple released Boot Camp, do you?

  10. I don’t really think it did.

    What I’d like to see is native mac support. Universal binaries so that I could play on my g5 imac. No need to reboot to play a game. And an easier process for the layman rather than fussing with installing windows, etc… that ease of use is, afterall, what the mac is all about, right?

    I’m hoping what bootcamp proves is that there’s a large potential customer base on mac. Not windows-base large, but still a decent amount of money.

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