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Mark Sue, an analyst at RBC Capital Markets has put together a great overview of the state of the fiber to the home market, and has thrown in a nice update on the IPTV deployments as well. In his estimate, there are about 6 million fiber-connected […]

Mark Sue, an analyst at RBC Capital Markets has put together a great overview of the state of the fiber to the home market, and has thrown in a nice update on the IPTV deployments as well. In his estimate, there are about 6 million fiber-connected homes worldwide, up 140% from last year, and a majority are in Japan. James Enck, who is in town for VoN explained that is because NTT has adopted a scorch earth philosophy and is using fiber to snuff out pesky upstarts like Softbank.

Most of the other deployments, however are in the early stages. In China, China Telecom and China Netcom are conducting FTTH trials while in Hong Kong, Hong Kong Broadband, a company I have written about in the past is passing through nearly 1/3 of total homes with fiber. Only telcos in the Scandinavian countries, as well as the Netherlands and Magnet Networks in Ireland are building-out large FTTH networks. Instead, we are seeing a lot more action from the municipalities which are sinking fiber in the ground.


Back in North America, things are only getting started. Verizon is building-out an all fiber network. AT&T will use a combination of FTTN for overbuilds and FTTP for new builds, while BellSouth is building-out an FTTC network. Bell Canada is deploying a FTTN network and supplementing it with VDSL and ADSL2+ over the last 3,000 feet. Still, like Europe, North American action is around smaller telecoms, and munis, which are being aggressive in rolling out Fiber networks.

Since I have written about Asian IPTV numbers before, I am not going to go over that. Sue has sent me an update on the European IPTV deployments – which stand at about one million, and will grow to 4 million by 2008. Believe it or not, this damn IPTV thing is going to take a lot longer than people realize.

France Telecom has over 210,000 subscribers and Neuf has over 100,000 subscribers. In Italy, FastWeb currently has the largest subscriber base in Europe with ~350,000 subscribers.

In Germany, DT is looking to have preliminary IPTV services up and running for the World Cup. In the UK, Video Networks already provides IPTV services to ~20,000 subscribers, while BT’s video launch will be available in the fall 2006.

Elsewhere in Europe, Telefonica Spain is offering its Imagenio TV service and has about 220,000 subscribers according to our estimates. Austria Telekom just launched IPTV services in and around the Vienna area, while Swisscom’s Bluewin offering was delayed until summer 2006. Belgacom offers IPTV services to ~25,000 subscribers.

By Om Malik

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  1. Nice little IPTV article… I sure wish everyone would roll IPTV out to the masses faster.
    Dan

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  2. I have been salivating over the possibilities of IPTV for a while now, but ironically, I may never have access to it in my current home. I live outside the Tucson, AZ city limits, and don’t even have DSL or cable access, so what do you think my chances will be of ever getting fiber in my area?

    WiMax would probably not help either, as I would practically require a whole 40Meg backhaul path just for myself.

    Om is right about one thing. This is going to take a lot longer than people think. Consider this…

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  3. Your report is missing French operator Illiad, which has 1.1 million IPTV subscribers.

    “Through unbundling it now provides 1.3 million customers with VoIP, 1.1 million with IPTV and 200,000 with video-on-demand”

    http://www.telegeography.com/cu/article.php?article_id=11693&email=html

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  4. It’s great to see healthy growth in IPTV but are there more examples of how IPTV expands how it can be used as a delivery system? For example, last week RBC Capital Markets released a report (http://www.rbc.com/newsroom/20060810tv.html) showing interest in IPTV due to the ability to watch content you want, when you want it. When will we see some interesting offerings like customized TV channels be rolled out?

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  5. [...] most online services require only “standard” broadband because that’s what the majority of US consumers have, and therefore that’s what Silicon Valley companies develop for. I’m not sure [...]

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