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Summary:

I’d heard various complaints about the MacBook Pros not having a PCMCIA PC Card slot, further confirmed by Dan Lurie’s “mini” review, which also mentioned the MacBook Pro however sporting an “ExpressCard” slot. It turns out ExpressCard™ is an industry standard developed by PCMCIA to carry […]

I’d heard various complaints about the MacBook Pros not having a PCMCIA PC Card slot, further confirmed by Dan Lurie’s “mini” review, which also mentioned the MacBook Pro however sporting an “ExpressCard” slot.

It turns out ExpressCard™ is an industry standard developed by PCMCIA to

carry forward the benefits of ‘plug-in’ I/O cards to the next generation of personal computing devices.

This standard was introduced in 2003. PCMag posted an insightful overview of its potential applications 2 years ago.

Apple appears to be pioneering the industry-wide ExpressCard migration(oh snap, sorry about that). As of this writing, not a single a few Dell laptops appear to ship with ExpressCard (Product details –> tech specs –> Ports & Connections). Similar story for HP.

While ExpressCard appears to clearly be the way to go forward, it adds pressure on existing PC Card manufacturers to migrate their products and services toward the new standard. If you’re an EV-DO, UMTS/HSDPA, EDGE wireless Internet access PowerBook user, you’ll likely want to hold-off on getting the MacBook Pro until ExpressCard versions of the PC Card modems you use today become available on the market.

If you’re currently not an avid user of your PC Card slot, and are willing to wait a little while until the rest of the industry catches up to ExpressCard, the MacBook Pro just might be a good investment.

  1. Apple appears to be pioneering the industry-wide ExpressCard migration. As of this writing, not a single Dell laptop appears to ship with ExpressCard (Product details –> tech specs –> Ports & Connections). Similar story for HP.

    Do your homework. Both Dell and HP ship laptops that feature the ExpressCard slot, as do a variety of other PC laptop manufacturers.

    Even Dell’s lowest end laptops, the Inspiron B120 and B130 ship with ExpressCard support. Not only that but they support ExpressCard/34 AND ExpressCard/54.

    On the HP side.. their flagship ZD8000 desktop replacement laptop features ExpressCard, as does the HP dv8000z.

    HP/Compaq, Dell, Toshiba, Fujitsu, and IBM all currently have laptops with ExpressCard slots. All are already shipping, and have been shipping for sometime.

    Apple isn’t pioneering the ExpressCard migration, it had already begun before Apple even joined the party.

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  2. Do your homework. Both Dell and HP ship laptops that feature the ExpressCard slot, as do a variety of other PC laptop manufacturers.

    Do your homework. Both Dell and HP ship laptops that feature the ExpressCard slot, as do a variety of other PC laptop manufacturers.

    Ouch!

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  3. [...] o. Apple appears to be pioneering the industry-wide ExpressCard migration(oh snap, sorry about that). As of this writing, not a single a [...]

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  4. Certainly Apple is not the first to go this route – but they appear to be foolishly abandoning their core customer base for the Pro laptop. MacBook lacks a PC-card slot, lacks FW800, and lacks a modem or s-video port. I, for one, can’t see myself downgrading my connectivity by switching to the MacBookPro anytime soon – although the 17″ having FW800 is a step in the right direction, the market cannot support a PC-card free notebook at this time. Serious Power users demand connectivity NOW, not sometime in the nebulous future. ExpressCard has been around for nearly three years, still with no EVDO option available. Apple appears to have jumped the gun a little on this one. Perhaps by the holiday season they will rectify these problems, by ensuring the availability of EVDO-A cards for ExpressCard, and hopefully putting FW800 into the 15″ MacBook. Without those two options, a lot of PowerBook users will stay PowerBook users.

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  5. you guys are such babies…
    enjoy the new technology and stop whimpering

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