6 Comments

Summary:

If you watch Law & Order or The Wire as much as I do, you know that your cell phone records, your locations etc is all stored in a giant database at a phone company. What you also know that cops and legal officials can call […]

If you watch Law & Order or The Wire as much as I do, you know that your cell phone records, your locations etc is all stored in a giant database at a phone company. What you also know that cops and legal officials can call up that information, but what you don’t know is that now this information is available for sale on the web for a couple of hundred dollars, thanks to sites like Locatecell.com. The ease with which this information is available, has sent FBI and others in a tizzy.

Chicago Sun-Times reports that FBI is worried that agents can be compromised, just like their snitches. The potential for wide-scale abuse is not only imaginable, but quite possible. Chicago Sun-Times doesn’t really talk about how the information ends up with sites like Locatecell.com. Why aren’t the cell phone companies doing something to make sure that this information doesn’t leak out? I mean shutting down the supply is the best way to prevent this from happening. Anyone have more knowledge about this, please post a comment!

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  1. One of the few perks of living in a backwards nation like Italy is that doing as locatecell does is against the law unless you give them your written consenus. Yay. (The same law also makes unsolicited junk mail an offence, by the way.)

  2. PS: ‘you’ as in ‘the user who gave the data to the phone company’.

  3. Jesse Newland Sunday, January 8, 2006

    Verizon’s privacy policy has this wide open exception:

    We may use and share information about you: (a) so we can provide our goods or services; (b) so others can provide goods or services to us, or to you on our behalf; (c) so we or our affiliates can communicate with you about goods or services related to the ones you already receive (although you can call us any time if you don’t want us to do this); (d) to protect ourselves; or (e) as required by law, legal process, or exigent circumstances.

    A and B say to me that Verizon can do whatever they want with my data as long as they, um, need to do it to conduct their business. Seems as if they are probably having someone else process call logs to do their billing, and will say they aren’t responsible for what that company is doing with those records.

  4. Solomon Folks Sunday, January 8, 2006

    Now I realize why Warren Buffett does not use a cell phone nor does he invest in technology companies despite being good friends with Bill Gates.

  5. Michigan Telephone, VoIP and Broadband blog Monday, January 9, 2006

    Your cell phone records, available to anyone, for a price

    A troubling revelation for those concerned about personal privacy, by way of Om Malik’s blog. Om writes: If you watch Law & Order or The Wire as much as I do, you know that your cell phone records, your locations etc is all stored in a giant database …

  6. Steve George Monday, May 22, 2006

    whats the new motorola music phone called?

    Steve

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