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Summary:

Search Engine Watch’s Gary Price reports Google has filed a patent that helps speed up wireless data exchange over CDMA networks. Google has been slowly expanding into wireless domain – it has launched Mobile Search and Mobile GMail. This patent application shows that search engine company […]

Search Engine Watch’s Gary Price reports Google has filed a patent that helps speed up wireless data exchange over CDMA networks. Google has been slowly expanding into wireless domain – it has launched Mobile Search and Mobile GMail. This patent application shows that search engine company is taking the wireless opportunity seriously. I wonder what Qualcomm “The CDMA King” has to say about this? A quick call perhaps?

  1. Why? If the world is migrating to 3G and as is happening here in australia CDMA is to disappear, then why would Google invest in such a strategy?

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  2. 3G == WCDMA or CDMA2000 (i.e. both CDMA technologies). So, CDMA is not disappearing in 3g. In 4G, may be … not in 3G

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  3. Big freaking deal. Google obviously has a smart engineer who wants a patent filed (probably from Android or someother acquisition) and granted. Kudos to him!

    End of the day, the method by which they propose, encoding with a Hadamar function, is only useful if it can replicate the ability of existing CDMA systems to provide service at high bandwidth (okay 1 Mbps) AND high speed (>70 mph) in a reliable manner. It doesn’t initially seem that implmenting Hadamar functions will lead to a significant reduction in silicon cost for existing CDMA semi vendors (QCOM, Via Telecom, etc.).

    This is obviously a patent filed for creativity or engineering props rather than any real business opportunity for Google. Probably zero chance 3GPP2 will ever adopt it, but this Google engineer gets props from his fellow peers and can add a patent to his CV.

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  4. This patent references a design for a device that operates between 0 and 30 MHz. Assuming a quarter wavelength antenna would be required, your mobile device would be 17 feet long!

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  5. Well, they talk about having a method to use short antennas for transmission in the 0 to 30 MHz range, unlike conventional belief that large antennas would be needed

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  6. Jesse Kopelman Thursday, January 5, 2006

    True, they propose overcoming antenna issues with high gain amplifiers. This seems ass-backwards, as that is already the most expensive component in the “radio” part of a terminal or base-station and this would dramatically increase its cost. On the other hand, I am used to higher frequencies where amplifiers are harder to do. Maybe at 30 MHz they are much cheaper than I imagine. Another thought is that CDMA itself seemed ass-backwards to those used to prior techniques, so perhaps I should learn from others’ (Rod Nelson) stupidity and reserve judgement until someone tries to make one of these.

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  7. I disagree with Marks comment partially. Yes the world is migrating to 3G. There is a head to head compitition between two technologies. 1st is europs WCDMA(GSM extension) and americas CDMA 2K. The problem with WCDMA is compatibility where CDMA 2K is working fine elsewhere in world. Hence I see CDMA will gain edge over GSM in this battle and its a nice move by google.

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  8. To add to that even the TDMA networks who can opt for WCDMA or CDMA 2000 as their evolution path,are opting for CDMA 2000. In short no death for CDMA 2000 in near future.

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