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Summary:

A group of Cooper City High School teachers have developed a USB stick called the Amber Stick that parents can use to collect specific information about their children. The Amber Stick can then be used by authorities in the horrifying event that your child goes missing. […]

A group of Cooper City High School teachers have developed a USB stick called the Amber Stick that parents can use to collect specific information about their children. The Amber Stick can then be used by authorities in the horrifying event that your child goes missing. The teachers have configured the stick to make it easy for parents to input the information that law enforcement need immediately after a child goes missing to help get the proper details out for an Amber Alert. This is the single best use of USB sticks I have seen to date. The school is selling the Amber Sticks for $25 each and plan to pitch the idea to other schools soon.

  • The AMBER stick™ automatically creates “Missing Person” flyers instantly.
  • The AMBER stick™ automatically creates a file to be imported into a law enforcement officer’s computer.
  • The AMBER stick™ is password protected and all information is encrypted for total privacy.
  • The AMBER stick™ can hold information about your entire family all on one AMBER stick™ .

The AMBER stick™ is very simple to use:

  • Plug into any available USB port on your computer
  • Start the program and enter your password to unlock
  • Add your loved one’s information and photos
  • Done, close the program and un-plug from computer
  • Attach to your key chain or place in your wallet

(via Sun-Sentinel)

  1. Correction to the story.
    The Amber Stick was created and developed by a Florida Computer Programmer named David Alkoby.
    The Cooper City High School Teachers mentioned in the article were members of the first test group that was invited to test and review the Amber Stick.
    The Amber Stick was created by Mr. Alkoby aroung May 2005 and was first introduced to the market place by the above mentioned teachers around July of 2005.
    This correction was sent to the sun-sentinal editor and to the reporter, but no reply was given.

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