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Summary:

Robert Scoble and Shel Israel have named their book on corporate blogging very aptly as Naked Conversations is appropriate on a number of levels.  The entire process the duo used while writing the book and posting the chapters on the book blog captured the very spirit […]

Naked_conversationsRobert Scoble and Shel Israel have named their book on corporate blogging very aptly as Naked Conversations is appropriate on a number of levels.  The entire process the duo used while writing the book and posting the chapters on the book blog captured the very spirit of blogging and seems right for a book of this type.  Wiley, the publisher of Naked Conversations, was very nice to send me a galley of the book that will go on sale in January and since I have read the first few chapters I thought I would write up my first impressions of the book.  I will write a full review when I have finished the book but for now this initial impression will have to do.

Scoble and Israel give a brief history of corporate blogging in the beginning of the book with an emphasis on the blogging path that Microsoft took, with Scoble’s insider view of the resistance from many of the company’s senior executives.  The handful of executives that pushed for allowing employee blogging took a real career risk that has paid off many-fold for Microsoft.  The book goes on to lay out case history after case history to show how different companies have followed Microsoft’s path to use employee blogs to put a personal face in front of the consuming public.

I am really caught up reading Naked Conversations- Robert and Shel have written a very easy to read book in a totally conversational style that makes the reader feel they are sitting down and having a conversation with the authors.  This definitely gives the book a "bloggy" feel to it and is no doubt intentional and very appropriate.  The book flows very naturally and feels right to me, and is very well done in this regard.  So far there is only one complaint I have about the book and this is probably the publisher’s fault.  The page numbers in the galley I have start over at page one at each chapter, which is a pet peeve of mine.  It is impossible to get a feel for where you are in the overall book as most chapters are pretty short so page numbers are recycling every few pages.  I think this is a big mistake on the publisher’s part and I hope the final copy of the book drops this lousy page numbering scheme.

  1. James,
    First off your note to me earlier today was not correct. I have been enjoying JK OnTheRun for a while. Second, thanks for these very kind words. I’ll comment more shortly over at Naked Conversations. Finally, I am told that the goofy pagnation is required for the proofing editing process. I’m not sure why. Again, James thanks.

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  2. Thanks, Shel. I figured the pagination was due to the fact I have a galley but it was so annoying I decided to mention it in case the publisher was actually considering keeping it.

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  3. James: Yes, the restarting pagination is definitely a galley only “feature.” :) We were planning on Shel and Robert making extensive enough post-galley changes (which they did – even galley readers will find a few surprising new tidbits in the final book) that real pagination wasn’t worth the extra time at that stage. :)
    I’m glad you like what you’ve seen otherwise.

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