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Summary:

One of the cool little upgrades that came with the new PowerBooks is a feature called “Safe Sleep”. Essentially, every time you put the machine, the contents of the RAM (your unsaved documents, the status of your open programs, etc.) is saved to the HDD. If […]

One of the cool little upgrades that came with the new PowerBooks is a feature called “Safe Sleep”. Essentially, every time you put the machine, the contents of the RAM (your unsaved documents, the status of your open programs, etc.) is saved to the HDD. If for some reason or another the machine totally looses power, the system environment that you had when you put the computer to sleep will be restored when you plug in the power adapter or pop in a fresh battery. This feature is very similar to the “hibernate” feature that has been present on PC notebooks for a few years.

Andrew Escobar, the man who brought us Mail Stamps, has figured out that there is no hardware support needed for this feature, and that it can be enabled on any recent Mac via some Open Firmware hacking.

Your mission, dear readers, if you choose to accept it, is to attempt this hack on your Mac; be it a Mac mini or a PowerBook. Post the results here.

Remember, any time you alter system files, you run the risk of damaging your Mac. Always back-up your system before attempting any kind of hack.

Good luck!

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By Dan Lurie

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  1. Hmm, broken link?

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  2. Hey,

    I got safe sleep to work on my iBook. It works very very well.
    I can now put my iBook to sleep, pull my battery, put a new one in and resume my work.

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  3. Worked well on my 12″ iBook G4 1.33Ghz 512MB RAM.

    I was surprised at how quickly my iBook went to sleeep (with no applications open).

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  4. i have a regular mac ibook g4 and i have to have an administrative password in order to get to all of the personal things . think you can help???????????????

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  5. That’s great, but did you know that many users seek to DISable safe sleep because of it’s tendency to render hard drives irreparable without any kind of warning? Look it up ;)

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