Summary:

It is really hard to figure out what FCC and its e911 announcements really mean, and how serious it really is about this whole issue. In what seems to be a Washington DC version of the “boy who cried wolf” FCC snarls and tells VoIP service […]

It is really hard to figure out what FCC and its e911 announcements really mean, and how serious it really is about this whole issue. In what seems to be a Washington DC version of the “boy who cried wolf” FCC snarls and tells VoIP service providers – thou shall comply by my e911 wishes or thou shall pull down your shutters. FCC gives a deadline, and then at the last minute decides to extend that deadline. Or come up with some crazy directive, that might as well mean lights out for tiny VoIP service providers. Well it happened today. Now the VoIP service providers don’t really have to worry about the November 28, 2005 deadline. As long as they don’t sell service to new customers in areas where they don’t have compliance. (FCC playing sado-masochistic games? :-) ) That cannot be good news for Vonage, which according to a mid-October article had a company spokesperson saying that only 10% of its users had e911 access. Vonage is not alone in this, though it is the biggest.

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