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Summary:

Incase you were wondering if I was too harsh on Microsoft’s nip-and-tuck, I have to say that there were two things that totally impressed me. The Microsoft Live Messenger which integrates IM with address book, email, and VoIP calling is the perfect, and perhaps the only […]

Incase you were wondering if I was too harsh on Microsoft’s nip-and-tuck, I have to say that there were two things that totally impressed me. The Microsoft Live Messenger which integrates IM with address book, email, and VoIP calling is the perfect, and perhaps the only next generation IM client out there.

The click to call (via Teleo, I am guessing) married to the maps was brilliant. I mean wow! We were only discussing this yesterday on how to marry Google Maps, and Google Talk. Microsoft KOs competition. Think of it as MSN messenger that got smarter, and then found a simpler-easier Friendster, a Plaxo, Intellisync client and well, a bag of chips. My hats off to the team that built Live IM client. It blows that it is not on a Mac.

Photo by niallkennedy.

  1. it really blows that it’s not in open beta.

    great coverage.

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  2. Can you say “Microsoft Dominance” one more time? On the web?

    Can anyone tell me who’s going to stop them? Fat chance.

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  3. Even though just the sound of “Windows Live” scares the bejeegers out of me!

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  4. [...] The unfinished nature of much of the work suggests a strong similarity to December 7th 1995, as many others have commented.  The fact that only Windows Live Mail, Live.com, Live Favorites, and Windows Live Safety Center are running really underscores that.  This is the easy stuff.  Who really needs another RSS reader at this point?  And the idea that we’re all creating massive personal indexes of favorites is so… 1995. Where are the tags? Apparently the demo of Live Messenger really rocked. It sounds like an early instantiation of the many ideas being discussed around Voice 2.0. I would have liked to have seen that, and I can hardly wait for the beta. [...]

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  5. Can anyone tell me who’s going to stop them? Fat chance.

    I was thinking the same thing myself. So many people are getting caught up in the craziness of Web 2.0 and the “Ago of Google” that they seem to forget who owns the personal computing market. It’s not like Microsoft is some random tech company. They are a powerhouse, and will continue to be for the forseeable future. If anything, I see Google, Mozilla and the like as good things for the “Big M”. Competition always forces Bill Gates & Co. into creating more innovative productsand pleasing the consumer first and thier stock holders second.

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  6. i am not particularly afraid of microsoft conquering the web. look at msn search – has that changed the pie chart of search marketshare? not much. did the introduction of gmail cause users to drop yahoo mail accounts in the millions? no. and this use-case as described above is over the heads of 99% of users, sorry but its the truth, most home users wouldn’t grok what is going on. its a cool demo but thats about it.

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  7. These new applications will be intesting to see how deeply they integrate with the entire online experience.

    MS has some good ideas right now, will be an intersting show to watch.

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  8. [...] Yahoo Maps and Microsoft Live Maps (along with VoIP) [...]

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  9. [...] The text ad model had been getting a long in the tooth, and perhaps voice is the application that will help them attract local advertisers. It will also put them on equal footing with Microsoft, which recently showed off their click-to-call offering. Mind you, it lacks the ability to display locations on the maps with click-to-call features built in, at lease for now. (If anyone has seen map-based ads with click to call, do let me know!) The new ad-system also allows them to compete with eBay-Skype. [...]

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  10. [...] Both Microsoft and Yahoo have already tested pay-per-call in one form or another (via Om and Search Engine Watch). I’d expect to see full implementations on all three search engines shortly. It’s a logical extension to each company’s core ad model, and my sense is that both advertisers and customers will find pay-per-call useful. Not sure what they will do to combat the inevitable explosion of crank calls, though… [...]

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