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Summary:

Are we at the cusp of a new media trend called attack the bloggers? First it was Advertising Age and now its Forbes. I am disappointed to say the least by Forbes’ over-the-top cover-story that paints bloggers as a lynch mob. The fact that it is […]

Are we at the cusp of a new media trend called attack the bloggers? First it was Advertising Age and now its Forbes. I am disappointed to say the least by Forbes’ over-the-top cover-story that paints bloggers as a lynch mob. The fact that it is the #1 story being discussed today, and has some of the most powerful people like Paul Kedrosky worked up, I fear it might give Forbes a chance to say, “I told you so!”

As someone who worked at Forbes in the past, I am going to be restrained for old times sake. This antiquated point of view is in sharp contrast to my days at the company, when it was the first main stream business magazine to recognize the importance of open source, so much to put it on the cover. Or that it was one of the first old media companies to embrace the web and launch Forbes.com, a site that quickly became a bastion of online journalistic excellence. Well that was in the past. The story makes some good points about the accuracy of blog posts, but they were lost in the fear-and-loathing approach taken by the magazine. I just found that the whole story was over-simplifed and had a one-sided take.

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  1. Bloggers Form Lynch Mobs, Prove Forbes Right

    When I was younger, I loved the cheesy “When Animals Attack!” television shows that were the standard fare on FOX. Well, sometimes Bloggers can act like animals, attacking others when their young (the Blogs) are attacked.

  2. The divide between “professional” journalists and bloggers will grow ever larger in the coming months and years.

    With no barriers to entry, and no quality control, will blogs become as valuable as spam?

    I blog for fun on moneyiyour pocket does being passionate about an issue make my opinion less valuable than that of someone who derives a paycheque from the advertisers of the paper or magazine they write for?

  3. Forbes journalist predicts own lynching

    In the cover story of the latest Forbes magazine, Daniel Lyons goes on the assault against blogs, calling them “the prized platform of an online lynch mob spouting liberty but spewing lies, libel and invective”.
    Things go downhill from …

  4. Continental OP Friday, October 28, 2005

    It is an old and silly discussion. Bloggers are moderated by their readers and by fellow bloggers (who are quick to pounce on any mistake, lie, omission, or perceived threat to themselves.) Nevertheless, this argument for a utopic Universal Content Filter still exists (as if the editors and advertisers have served this purpose well in traditional journalism.)

    Journalists predicting the end of journalism and the dangers of said end have always been and will always be utter bores. (Especially at Forbes. No offense Om. :) )

  5. The Bay Area Is Talking Friday, October 28, 2005

    Forbes Slams Bloggers, Om Doesn’t Like It

    If you haven’t read Terry Heaton’s response to a recent Ad Age story slamming bloggers for wasting the time of America’s workforce, read it. Same goes for Om Malik’s broadsides attack on his former employer Forbes over the bidness magazine’s…

  6. The Power Of The Schwartz Friday, October 28, 2005

    Daniel Lyons Suggests Harassing ISPs To Fight Back Against Blogs

    … he advocates complaining to their ISPs about copyright violations, subpoenaing the ISPs to get information about bloggers, and even threatening to sue the ISPs even though he points out that the host isn’t liable for content posted on its systems….

  7. mathewingram.com/work » Blog Archive » Revenge of the blog-o-sphere Friday, October 28, 2005

    [...] If Forbes magazine was looking for some attention from the Internet, they certainly got what they were asking for. Unfortunately, it isn’t coming because of some fine-quality, well-written journalism, but because of what bloggers are taking as a drive-by-shooting style rant about how bloggers are dirty, rotten, lying scumbags. The piece by Daniel Lyons is more or less about a battle between one man whose company and stock were hammered by a blogger who pretended to be someone else, but along the way Lyons casts some aspersions against bloggers as a whole. Reaction (not surprisingly) has come from far and wide, including Dan Gillmor at Bayosphere, Steve Rubel at MicroPersuasion, the guys over at We Break Stuff and Paul Kedrosky at Infectious Greed. Is it a deliberate attempt by Forbes to get some coverage in the blog-o-sphere — even if it’s negative? Perhaps. Or it could just be that publisher Malcolm Forbes got a bee in his bonnet about blogs for some reason. Meanwhile, Chris Pirillo notes sarcastically that magazines also suffer from some of the same problems. But Om Malik (who used to work for the magazine before he moved to Business 2.0, says he is reserving judgment for the moment. [...]

  8. I will be posting a podcast from Daniel’s boss Steve Forbes (his first podcast) on Monday on PodTech.net where Steve actually supports podcasting and blogs as the revolution that has changed and will change the economics of the world and of course it will be bloggers that will enact the flat tax :-)

  9. Ross Mayfield Friday, October 28, 2005

    Here’s the old media’s new business model. Attack, gain attention, profit form attention, rinse, denial, lather and repeat.

  10. Laughing Squid » Forbes Flogs Blogs Saturday, October 29, 2005

    [...] Want to get a bunch of coverage from bloggers while pissing them off at the same time? Just publish a cover story trashing blogs, calling bloggers “lynch mobs” and providing information on how to “fight back”. More on this from Doc Searls, Xeni Jardin at Boing Boing, Dan Gillmor, Om Malik and Steve Rubel. Web logs are the prized platform of an online lynch mob spouting liberty but spewing lies, libel and invective. Their potent alliles in this pursuit include Google and Yahoo. [...]

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