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Summary:

Some nuggets from San Francisco RFI about city wide wireless/WiFi network… Gigabeam is proposing a 1-2.5GBps wireless backbone at 71-76, 81-86Ghz bands. JiWire wants to provide VPN services EarthLink wants to sell residential broadband (1 Mbps downstream and upstream) for less than $20.00 per month with […]

Some nuggets from San Francisco RFI about city wide wireless/WiFi network…

  • Gigabeam is proposing a 1-2.5GBps wireless backbone at 71-76, 81-86Ghz bands.
  • JiWire wants to provide VPN services
  • EarthLink wants to sell residential broadband (1 Mbps downstream and upstream) for less than $20.00 per month with multiple competing service providers. San Francisco-would not have to spend any dollars on the build-out, which would use equipment from Motorola and Tropos Networks.
  • Feeva  wants to license their technology, and suggest a multi-business approach to the city’s needs.
  • Motorola says it would build a mesh-network that would provide broadband speed to support next generation applications such as video surveillance, transmittal of mug shots and fingerprints, in-car video and personnel geo-location. (Try selling that to privacy activists in the city!) Consumers and government agencies use different parts of the spectrum.
  • MetroFi , representing veterans of Covas plans a 1GBps backbone to serve 1 megabit symmetrical connections for $19.95 a month along with free, advertiser-supported connections.  MetroFi’s offer looks like a franchise agreement — they’d own the network, the city would deed roof and pole rights, and MetroFi would be the exclusive access provider.
  • SFLan, says it costs $7-8 per subscriber in overhead just to processing billing, and instead the city should create a citywide, wholesale internet exchange, paid for by a bond issue. They are against captive portals setups (like Feeva’s at the Main Library), and want open-source, standards-compliant hardware and software running neutral network that The City owns.
  • WiLine, a local company, just wants to provide the WiMax backbone technology.

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  1. Daniel Nicolas Tuesday, October 18, 2005

    In Cory Doctorow’s book, Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town, they were trying to build a city-wide wifi network as well. I think Cory explored many of the problems and issues of city-wide wifi and it’s a good read.

  2. Om Malik’s Broadband Blog — » Politics of San Francisco WiFi Project Tuesday, October 18, 2005

    [...] An ambitious politician would be smart to become an ally of Google, and Gavin has shown panache in taking popular progressive causes (such as municipal broadband and same-sex marriage) and making them his own. However, expect neighborhood representatives on the Board of Supervisors to oppose any move to let a company monopolize more critical infrastructure. The battles over Comcast, SBC and PG&E’s monopolies are second only to real estate issues when it comes to rough-and-tumble local politics. The Board of Supervisors, San Francisco community activists and open network advocates will fight tenaciously to make sure that their concerns are addressed. While Gavin and Google have made splashy promises of rapid deployment, don’t hold your breath — the fight in San Francisco City Hall has just begun. (The San Francisco WiFi Players!) [...]

  3. » links for 2005-10-21  InsideGoogle » part of the Blog News Channel Thursday, October 20, 2005

    [...] Om Malik’s Broadband Blog — » And the other San Francisco WiFi Bidders (tags: google wifi san_francisco) [...]

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