47 Comments

Summary:

One of the distinctive qualities of the Web 2.0 companies has been their reliance on community mostly and early adopters. Flickr is a good example. This two-way interaction between the start-up and the users provided the bedrock for a ground breaking service. Google Maps, is another […]

One of the distinctive qualities of the Web 2.0 companies has been their reliance on community mostly and early adopters. Flickr is a good example. This two-way interaction between the start-up and the users provided the bedrock for a ground breaking service.

Google Maps, is another example, where community’s efforts have resulted in the original concept being remixed, enough times over, to completely overshadow the rivals. In this two-way collaboration for innovation, the corporations will have to deal with this radical democratization of capitalism.

Robert Young, who has in recent past contributed some thoughtful analysis, emailed his thoughts. This is the distillation of his thoughts…

Guest post by Robert Young.

The thing that I find most compelling about the Internet, as a whole, is its power to turn well-rooted, traditional business norms upside down on its head. As a result, there is very high value in the ability to think about strategic matters in counterintuitive fashion (I attribute the success of Google to such abilities, as I wrote in my last piece). Jeff Jarvis summed it up nicely

Beware the big company that tries to venture into this, the small world owned by its individuals, without proper respect and perspective… The issue is that we, the people, believe we own this space — not just blogs, not just online, but anyplace where we put our effort and trust and money. And isn’t it modern corporate nirvana to be a “we company” instead of a “they company”? But you have to mean it.

For anyone who has had the opportunity to run a large web-based community, Jeff’s eloquent words will resonate deeply. There’s a certain level of what (for the lack of a better phrase) I will refer to as cognitive dissonance when you run a business based on community. And that’s that you quickly realize that the members of the community feel strongly that the service belongs to them, and the control that you, the corporation, think you have is actually, in large part, an illusion.

After all, a community, by definition generates its own content, its own style and culture… it’s all by the people, for the people. As a result, if you’re an executive at such a company, you oftentimes feel more like a politician than a businessperson. To do anything that would suggest that you, as the corporation, owns and controls the service (and in effect, the community) is, well, akin to heresy. This is something Rupert Murdoch will have to contend with, as the new owner of MySpace.

As the worlds of media and technology collide with a force that can split an atom, such cognitive dissonance is a natural by-product of the fact that more and more content (and code) is being produced by the people themselves. At the same time, with the increasing digitization of media, the definition of “distribution” is also changing from channels previously rooted in the physical world to one where people themselves become the new distribution channels via tightly and loosely-coupled social networks connected together by the universal language of IP and bits.

So as time goes by, the foundation of ownership and control for content and distribution is increasingly shifting from corporate entities to people and communities. A phenomenon that will cause countless sleepless nights for old media and old-line technology leaders who don’t fully comprehend the significance of the dynamics at hand.

This shift in the balance of power has immense strategic implications for traditional media conglomerates and technology vendors. It represents a classic disruption of markets and, of its many consequences, probably the single most important ramification is the impact that it has on the concept known as “switching costs”, a business model feature designed to extend competitive advantage. The most recent example of a company that executed almost flawlessly on the classic definition is actually a new media player, and one we’re all familiar with… AOL.

During Internet 1.0, AOL was the master of creating high switching costs. Using the email address as the cornerstone, they were able to lock-in their subscribers into a garden with very high walls. In fact, they locked up the gates so well that there are still 20+ million people who subscribe to AOL’s dial-up service (which, consequently, enables AOL to generate more annual revenues than either Yahoo! or Google, to this day). Even at a time when broadband access is oftentimes less expensive, their subscribers are hesitant to switch away from their AOL email addresses.

But in a world where people themselves are increasingly becoming the sources of content and the owners of distribution, any product development strategy that aims to proactively increase switching costs becomes antithetical to the gravitational pull of the market (as AOL is now painfully experiencing). In fact, in many markets, we are likely to see an inversion of control, where vendors will increasingly rely on their customers to provide them with their strategic and competitive advantages. Put another way, the tail will start wagging the dog.

So in such an open and unpredictable environment of consumer control, what happens to the notion of switching costs? The answer, on its surface, is actually quite simple. The importances of switching costs do not disappear. They will always remain a critical success factor for building market share and defending against competition. What does change, however, is who creates and controls it.

It won’t be the corporation that locks its customers into a walled garden any more; instead, it will be the people themselves who create their own high switching costs. For instance, if you are an eBay seller, your switching cost is not so much the relationship you’ve created with eBay itself and the store you set up, it’s the reputation and trust you spent years building with fellow members of the community. Similarly, if you are a member of MySpace, it’s not the web-page and blog you spent time constructing, it’s your social network of cyber-friends you’ve cultivated and accumulated over time.

At the end, the lesson is one of a paradox. As the power shifts increasingly towards community, the corporation loses its grip on the traditional means of control. Yet, by letting go of control, the corporation creates an environment where the community willingly creates its own switching costs. Such changing market behavior, which is structural and permanent for any industry being usurped by the Internet, must be met with a corresponding shift in corporate mindset. Otherwise, a “generation gap” will exist between the members of management themselves (old vs. new media), as well as the company and its market. In my view, if there is one company that seems to grok such dynamics better than anyone, and is in the process of executing superbly against these new set of challenges, it’s Yahoo!

—————————————————–
Robert Young is a serial entrepreneur who is currently focused on http://www.weedshare.com, a P2P-enabling “superdistribution” digital media service. Previously, he was an exec at Delphi Internet Services (which he sold to Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.), and founder/ceo of Freemark Communications (where he led the invention of free email and pay-per-click advertising).

  1. Robert,

    Since Rupert is quite old (is he nearly 70 years of age now?), what is the likelihood of him being able to make the transition with MySpace? Remember how hard of a time he had with Delphi and News Electronic Data run by the late John B. Evans in the early to mid-1990s?

    Share
  2. Community vs. the Corporation and My Role

    In a guest blog post on Om Malik’s site, Robert Young brilliantly lays out the changing dynamic between companies and communities as more of tomorrow’s content and services move on-line. I’m going to quote it heavily here because he’s saying things…

    Share
  3. Tabitha,

    I don’t think the ability to grok is so much about age (after all, Evans “got” it and he was a contemporary of Murdoch). I think it’s more an issue of having an open mind and re-educating yourself to the new realities of a new marketspace… even if they conflict with what you’ve always thought of as true. On that note, I’m certainly not going to underestimate Murdoch.

    Share
  4. Robert Young made a great post as Om Malik’s guest blogger yesterday. However, I wonder what happens to switching costs if and when elements of identity are set free by the next generation of Internet companies?

    Share
  5. [...] In a guest post at GigaOm, Robert Young reacts to this post and draws out a convincing argument for why corporate executives have to lose control to consumers — who aren’t customers but are the boss — so they can, in the end, gain control. Hard to summarize: Just go read. [...]

    Share
  6. http://www.geek2us.net something that may of be interest to people that like this site.

    Share
  7. That’s a very interesting assumption. you can read more about this on
    http://www.bogeydope.com
    -bogey

    Share
  8. Inherent Truths and Value of Community

    Share
  9. All Your Money Are…: Part III: Classmates Blinks

    I realize this dispute with Classmates is kind of a distraction from the theme of the day, but there are probably more than a few dollars nipped from my pocket at stake. Plus, in the spirit of sovereignty of Flight…

    Share
  10. I read Mr. Young’s article and fundamentally disagreed with many of the points he puts forward.

    He opens by saying:

    The thing that I find most compelling about the Internet, as a whole, is its power to turn well-rooted, traditional business norms upside down on its head.

    Traditional business norms? Like what? Listening to your customers? Offering an honest service? Managing distribution channels? Advertising? How does the Internet turn these traditional understandings upside down? Brings them more into focus and improves them I agree, but turns them on their head? I don’t think so.

    Mr. Young proceeds to draw the following conclusion:

    As a result, there is very high value in the ability to think about strategic matters in counterintuitive fashion.

    Counter-intuitive fashion? A business won’t make money if its products or services don’t appeal to customers which is common sense and not in the least bit “counter-intuitive.â€? There are exceptions, like Microsoft, for example, whose products are buggy crap and people buy them anyway because conventionally, that’s what everyone else does. But the second that convention disappears, people will stop doing business with Microsoft and be glad to be rid of them. I consider Microsoft’s strategic thinking to be “counter-intuitiveâ€? since they release crap products full of bugs that frustrate the hell out of their customers yet Microsoft still makes money, and they do that because they have a large installed base and can get away with taking advantage of it, for now at least. So even their logic isn’t entirely “counter-intuitiveâ€?, just crappy, like their products, as I’ve mentioned three times in this paragraph. ; )

    When you look at the Internet the way Google does, the things they’ve done are not “counter-intuitiveâ€?. Every businessperson needs an inspiration, but it isn’t a “counter-intuitiveâ€? inspiration. If you didn’t think your idea would make money, you wouldn’t do it, so obviously there has to be a logical thread there. That Mr. Young can’t see that thread doesn’t make it “counter-intuitive.â€?

    Mr. Young continues:

    There’s a certain level of what … I will refer to as cognitive dissonance when you run a business based on community.

    Run a business based on community? You run a business based on customers, not communities. I’ve run and currently run businesses (online and offline operations) and none of them were or are “communities.â€? I love my customers, but my customers essentially have nothing to do with each other. It’s not a “community.â€? It’s a business. Blogs are not businesses, not yet anyway, though they can be a tool that supports a business and when more of them become businesses, i.e., generating profits, they’ll be businesses first, “communitiesâ€? second. In my opinion, the “communityâ€? notion will be a marketing ploy. Open source software organizations like WordPress I’d class as communities. If the time comes when WordPress starts charging for its software, it’ll become a business first, a “communityâ€? second, as Six Apart has done.

    eBay is not a community; it’s a marketplace that combines a Better Business Bureau with lots of little trading operations. eBay skims the cream. We can imagine we’re all part of a “communityâ€? if it makes us feel more secure, but we’re really part of a large marketplace where ‘Let The Buyer Beware’ is simply the easy matter of checking feedback.

    Backing up the community theme, Mr. Young then says:

    And that’s that you quickly realize that the members of the community feel strongly that the service belongs to them, and the control that you, the corporation, think you have is actually, in large part, an illusion.

    and

    To do anything that would suggest that you, as the corporation, owns and controls the service (and in effect, the community) is, well, akin to heresy.

    We can complain about Yahoo buying Flickr and not like the changes Yahoo want to make, and even though I’m no great fan of Yahoo these days, it is their right to request Flickr users to sign up to Yahoo and it is the right of Flickr users to say “up yours!â€? and take their business elsewhere. A little inconvenience maybe, but nothing more.

    The point is that there is no “illusionâ€? here or new “mindsetâ€? required, as Mr. Young is suggesting. Everybody knows that a business that buys another business (whether it’s an internet-based business or a market stall in Canada) has control over the asset they’ve purchased. They also know that if they do anything to drive enough customers away, it ceases to be an asset. Listening to what your customers want is the first priority of any business, or it should be anyway. (Microsoft, Dell, are you listening? Probably not. But they will when their profits feel the strain though I’m betting that publicly they’ll blame the economic climate or the upcoming Asian tigers … anything but themselves). The “mindsetâ€? is the same as it has always been: satisfied customers.

    Mr. Young goes on to say:

    So as time goes by, the foundation of ownership and control for content and distribution is increasingly shifting from corporate entities to people and communities.

    All businesses are founded on the same principles and the control of the content and distribution will always be with the business. The better the content and the distribution, the more customers the company will reach and the more successful it will be. We may be better informed and our standards may be rising, but we cannot control directly how a company produces their content or distributes it. Indirectly, we can influence their decisions, but they have to decide to be influenced. If a company produces crap, like Dell or Microsoft (fourth use of the word ‘crap’ with regard to Microsoft! Sorry, folks, I can’t stand shoddy work), they can no longer hide as easily or as long behind their polished public facade. The Internet has not fundamentally changed how business is done; it just makes doing business and sourcing information faster and easier.

    Finally, I’d like to quote the conclusion of Mr. Young’s article:

    In my view, if there is one company that seems to grok such dynamics better than anyone, and is in the process of executing superbly against these new set of challenges, it’s Yahoo!

    I can only speak from personal experience with Yahoo. I think Yahoo! used to be great, but are now embracing the trends of their less honest, grubbier competitors. Four years ago, I signed up to a web hosting service with them. Recently, they introduced major upgrades, offering ten times the bandwidth and storage for less money than their old plans, which I had agreed to. When I went to upgrade, I was told that this plan was not available to existing customers and that if I wanted it, I would have to pull down my website and lose all of our e-mail. Apparently, they do not have the capability to transfer my website and e-mail files because their new offer is being hosted on a different server. Yet by some miracle they are able to bring in your email account if you are doing business with a competitor. Why are they punishing loyal customers? Do they want to drive me elsewhere? I think the answer is yes and that’s exactly what I am going to do

    Share
  11. Noel G., great response, you took the words right out of my mouth. Democratic capitalism–what!?

    Share
  12. Noel G:

    Your arguments about communities only make sense when you completely leave out Robert’s point about leveraging the users themselves as a form of switching cost, and that is exactly what you did.

    Good points, but incomplete analysis.

    Share
  13. Noel G. was close with that response, but some clarification is needed.

    First, you don’t “listen to customers” directly, you figure out what they want and what they will pay for. I’m reminded of an old Dilbert cartoon where the PHB says, “We’re going to listen to our customers and give them what they want,” and one of the peons says, “Our customers want better products for free.” Obviously, you can’t remain in business if you do that. The trick is to find how to do what the customer wants profitably.

    Second, the business must always be in control. The illusion in this scenario is the illusion that the community is “in control”, because the community is made up of selfish individuals that only really want what will benefit them. If you let the community have true control, they will start giving away anything you make or do for free, and you won’t stay in business long. I find it surprising that people find this so hard to swallow, because if you look at Linux you’ll see that Linus rules that with an iron fist. He takes suggestions and work from the community, but he’s the final arbiter. He’s the one with ultimate control about what goes into the core Linux and what does not. Of course, then other people have taken that and gone in new directions, but then they often in turn try to sell services to other people.

    I’ve been working with online communities professionally for nearly a decade. I have some experience in this area.

    Share
  14. [...] Young said: “At the end, the lesson is one of a paradox. As the power shifts increasingly towards community,the members of management themselves (old vs. new media), as well as the company and its market.”   #     [...]

    Share
  15. Community And The Media: Where Will It Begin?

    There is a great guest post by Robert Young over at Om Malik’s blog in reaction to a post by Jeff Jarvis that distills the changing dynamics between a corporation and its customer community down to its essence: As the…

    Share
  16. [...] Malik’s Broadband Blog » Inherent Truths and Value of Community. #Development [...]

    Share
  17. Han, re: switching costs. I agree that if you’ve got a good reputation, for example, on eBAY, you’re not going to want to leave. We have to weigh up the pros and cons of continuing to do business with anyone. That’s nothing new and it’s not going to change anytime soon. A business can make it difficult for us to switch, but if they’re not providing what we want, then that’s a decision we have to take. And we will, switching costs and “community” aura be damned.

    B. Green, I don’t mean that we should give away the farm or implement every suggestion a customer makes. No one expects anyone to take losses. By listening to customers, we not only get to respond to their complaints, we also get to hear about other things they might be interested in and would be willing to pay for.

    Share
  18. Community as product lock-in?

    Om Malik posts some thoughts from Robert Young reagrding community in product creation and the impact on company philosophy. One interesting point is how a cummunity in the end becomes its own lock-in to a product. Hmm. Am I locked

    Share
  19. [...] I’m hesitant to enter into the lively discussion surrounding exactly what “Web 2.0″ means, but I’ll venture this: one important part of Web 2.0 is the separation of user data from the applications that use it, and the idea that users should own and control this data. In this vein, Dorrian Porter recently pointed me to a post he made a couple of months ago following up on a post made by Robert Young as a guest blogger for Om Malik. [...]

    Share
  20. [...] Robert Young, earlier this year, explained to my readers why Rupert Murdoch really bought MySpace for $583 million. He argued that we should wait for Rupert to launch a record label and a music channel that takes on MTV and knocks it off its top spot. Well today, both those things happened. Young has decided to update story, and has written a stirring post, that reminds Murdoch’s men to not get blinded by the Hollywood Bright Lights, or else they ruin the carefully woven fabric of My Space community. This is not the first time he has argued for handling the community with velvet gloves. [...]

    Share
  21. [...] Second, most of the Internet organizations are placing more emphasis on usage (direct or indirect via APIs) than subscribers (eyeballs). This is a great step towards a building stronger Internet in which closed Internet services, such as today’s Instant Messaging networks, will hopefully be pushed out of this ecosystem. It is always a great milestone when an industry understands that backing a larger cake might be more beneficial than trying to take a bigger piece of a smaller cake (see the Inherent Truths and Value of Community). [...]

    Share
  22. Communities create the future.. they are actually the future itself. But any community needs a devoted leader to stream everythnig right… that’s what I think…

    Share
  23. [...] Nothing social about that. It reminded me of Robert Young’s on whose community is it anyway? After all, a community, by definition generates its own content, its own style and culture… it’s all by the people, for the people. So as time goes by, the foundation of ownership and control for content and distribution is increasingly shifting from corporate entities to people and communities. A phenomenon that will cause countless sleepless nights for old media and old-line technology leaders who don’t fully comprehend the significance of the dynamics at hand. [...]

    Share
  24. Well today, both those things happened. Young has decided to update story, and has written a stirring post, that reminds Murdoch’s men to not get blinded by the Hollywood Bright Lights, or else they ruin the carefully woven fabric of My Space community. This is not the first time he has argued for handling the community with velvet gloves

    Share
  25. [...] Robert Young is a serial entrepreneur. He was an exec at Delphi Internet Services (which he sold to Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.), and founder/ceo of Freemark Communications. His past columns for GigaOM.com include Inherent truths and value of Community; Why Murdoch Bought MySpace and Murdoch, WiMax and the Two Way Web.. [...]

    Share
  26. רҵSBS¡¢PVC¡¢¾Û°·Ö®£¨·¿¶¥¡¢µØÏÂÊÒ¡¢Ô¡ÊÒ¡¢²ÞËùµÈ·ÀË®¹¤³Ìά»¤£©£¬ÐÅÓþÖÊÁ¿µÚÒ»£¡¿ÉÒÔÇ©¶¨³¤ÆÚºÏͬ£¡£¡»¶Ó­ÆóÊÂÒµµ¥Î»Ç¡Ì¸£®
    ÁªÏµµç»°£º13103945222 QQ£º510016988 E-MAIL£ºIP128@126.com

    Share
  27. TiffanyÊÇÒøÊÎÆ·×î¾­µäµÄÆ·ÅÆ,³çÉÐÉݳ޵ÄŮʿһ¶¨ÒªÓÐÒ»¼þÕýÆ·µÄTiffanyÒøÊÎÆ·¡£J

    Share
  28. ±¾¹«Ë¾³¤ÆÚ³öÊÛ¸÷ÖÖ ÎÞÏßÓ°Òô´«Êäϵͳ£¬°µ·ÃÉãÏñ»ú£¬
    ¸÷ÖÖ΢ÐÍÕë¿×ÉãÏó»ú£¬ÊÖ»ú±äÉùÆ÷
    Æû³µµç×Ó¹·»¶Ó­Ç°À´Ñ¡¹º .¿ÉµÇ½ÍøÕ¾;www.xsdz988.com

    Share
  29. Ï뿪ʱÉн¡ÉíÆ÷²ÄרÂôµêÂð£¿
    ÎÒ³§µçÊÓ¹ºÎïÏð¹û¹ú¼Ê½¡Éí²úÆ·½¡ÉíÒÎϵÁС¢Ì¤²½»úϵÁС¢º«¹úºôÀ­È¦µÈ²úÆ·ÕýÈÈÏúÖУ¬¡°ÊæÒ࿵¡±·è¿ñ˦֬»úÎÒ³§½öÊÛ1899Ôª£¨µçÊÓ¹ºÎï4489Ôª£©¡£ÏêÇéÇëµÇ½ÎÒ³§ÍøÕ¾£ºwww.gd686.com ×Éѯ£º05798050271 13362971838ÁúÏÈÉú
    Õã½­ÓÀ¿µÊйâ´ó½¡ÉíÆ÷²Ä³§

     4935
    
    Share
  30. Ï뿪ʱÉн¡ÉíÆ÷²ÄרÂôµêÂð£¿
    ÎÒ³§µçÊÓ¹ºÎïÏð¹û¹ú¼Ê½¡Éí²úÆ·½¡ÉíÒÎϵÁС¢Ì¤²½»úϵÁС¢º«¹úºôÀ­È¦µÈ²úÆ·ÕýÈÈÏúÖУ¬¡°ÊæÒ࿵¡±·è¿ñ˦֬»úÎÒ³§½öÊÛ1899Ôª£¨µçÊÓ¹ºÎï4489Ôª£©¡£ÏêÇéÇëµÇ½ÎÒ³§ÍøÕ¾£ºwww.gd686.com ×Éѯ£º05798050271 13362971838ÁúÏÈÉú
    Õã½­ÓÀ¿µÊйâ´ó½¡ÉíÆ÷²Ä³§

     4829
    
    Share
  31. Ï뿪ʱÉн¡ÉíÆ÷²ÄרÂôµêÂð£¿
    ÎÒ³§µçÊÓ¹ºÎïÏð¹û¹ú¼Ê½¡Éí²úÆ·½¡ÉíÒÎϵÁС¢Ì¤²½»úϵÁС¢º«¹úºôÀ­È¦µÈ²úÆ·ÕýÈÈÏúÖУ¬¡°ÊæÒ࿵¡±·è¿ñ˦֬»úÎÒ³§½öÊÛ1899Ôª£¨µçÊÓ¹ºÎï4489Ôª£©¡£ÏêÇéÇëµÇ½ÎÒ³§ÍøÕ¾£ºwww.gd686.com ×Éѯ£º05798050271 13362971838ÁúÏÈÉú
    Õã½­ÓÀ¿µÊйâ´ó½¡ÉíÆ÷²Ä³§

     8077
    
    Share
  32. ³§¼ÛÅú·¢×îпƼ¼Ð²úÆ·£¬.1.²»ÓõçµÄ×Ô¶¯Çåɨ»ú(ʮ̨ÒÔÉÏ38Ԫһ̨)¡£2.µç¶¯×Ô¶¯É¨µØ»ú(Ê®Ì×ÒÔÉÏ86ÔªÒ»Ì×) ÏêÇéÇëµÇ½ÎÒ³§ÍøÕ¾www.gd686.com ×Éѯ\ÏúÊÛÈÈÏß:0579-8050271
    13362971838 ÁªÏµÈË:ÁúÏÈÉú
    Õã½­ÓÀ¿µÊйâ´ó½¡ÉíÆ÷²Ä³§ÏúÊÛ²¿

     3901
    
    Share
  33. 253

    Share
  34. ±¾¹«Ë¾³¤ÆÚ³öÊÛ¸÷ÖÖ ÎÞÏ߶ú»úרÂô,ÎÞÏßÓ°Òô´«Êäϵͳ£¬°µ·ÃÉãÏñ»ú£¬
    ¸÷ÖÖ΢ÐÍÕë¿×ÉãÏó»ú£¬ÊÖ»ú±äÉùÆ÷
    Æû³µµç×Ó¹·»¶Ó­Ç°À´Ñ¡¹º .¿ÉµÇ½ÍøÕ¾;www.xsdz988.com

    Share
  35. ¹©Ó¦Æû³µ·­×ªÅÆÕÕ¼Ü,Æû³µ·­×ªÅÆÕÕ,Æû³µ·­×ªÆ÷,Æû³µ·­ÅÆÆ÷,Æû³µÒ£¿Ø·­ÅÆÆ÷,Æû³µ×Ô¶¯·­ÅÆÆ÷,Æû³µÅÆÕÕ×Ô¶¯·­×ªÏµÍ³,±¾²úÆ·¶ÔʹÓÃÁ½¸öÅÆÕյġ¢µ¥Î»ºÍ¸öÈËÓû§£¬ÊDz»¿É¶àµÃµÄÒ»¸öºÃ²úÆ·¡£¸Ã²úÆ·Éè¼ÆÐÂÓ±£¬¹¹ÔìÇÉÃÍâ¹Û¾«ÃÀ£¬¿Éͬʱ°²×°Á½¸±Æû³µÅÆÕÕ(Èç:ÈüÅÆ¡¢¾¯Ê¾±êÓïµÈ£©£¬²ÉÓÃÁË΢´¦ÀíÆ÷¿ØÖƵç·Óë»úе½á¹¹Ïà×éºÏ£¬ÎÞÂÛ³µÁ¾ÊÇÔÚ¸ßËÙÐÐÊ»»òֹͣ״̬ʱ£¬¾ù¿Éͨ¹ýÒ£¿ØÆ÷¿ØÖÆʵÏÖÆû³µÅÆÕÕ×Ô¶¯¸ü»»¡£
    ÒþÐÎÎÞÏ߶ú»ú¡£ ÎÞÏßÓ°Òô´«Êäϵͳ£¬°µ·ÃÉãÏñ»ú£¬¿¼ÊÔרÓÃÉãÏñÍ·¡£¸÷ÖÖ΢ÐÍÕë¿×ÉãÏó»ú£¬13370654298

    Share
  36. Ç廪×Ϲâ½ÚÓͼÁÈ«¹úÑ°ÕÒ¾­ÏúºÏ×÷»ï°é£¬ºÃµÄ²úÆ·¼ÓÉϺõÄÆ·ÅƵÈÓڳɹ¦£¡Í¶ÈëÉÙ¡¢¼ûЧ¿ì£¬µÍ·çÏÕ¡¢¸ß³É³¤¡£°ÑÎÕ»úÓöʵÏÖÃÎÏ룡µÍ³É±¾ÇÐÈëÒ»¸ö»Æ½ðÐÐÒµ£¡Ò²ÐíÕâ¸öÑ¡Ôñ¸Ä±äÄãµÄÒ»Éú£¡»¶Ó­À´ÈËÀ´µç×ÉѯºÍ¸÷ÖÖ·½Ê½µÄºÏ×÷¡£ÁíÍâÓÐÄÉÃ×ÉúÎï²ñÓÍ£¬¼×ÒÒ´¼ÆûÓͲñÓ͵÷ºÍ£¬ÓÍÆ·ÍÑÉ«µÈ¼¼Êõ¿ÉºÏ×÷¡£
    Ç廪×ϹâȼÓͽÚÓͼÁ£¨www.jieyouji.com£©£¬Çå³ýÓÍÏä×ÔÓÉË®·Ý£¬Çå¾»µçÅç³µÅçÓÍ×콺ÖÊ£¨ºý×ì×Ó£©³¹µ×£¬Ìá¸ß¶¯Á¦15%–25%£¬½ÚʡȼÓÍ8%–15%¡£Ñø»¤·¢¶¯»ú£¬ÌáÉýȼÓ͵ÄȼÉÕЧÂÊ£¬Çå³ý»ýÌ¿80%–98%£¬½µµÍÅÅÎÛ40%-95%¡£Ïû³ý±¬Õ𣬼õÉÙȼÉÕ²îÒìÐÔ¡£½µµÍ·¢¶¯»ú¶ÔÐÁÍéÖµ£¬Ê®ÁùÍéÖµµÄʹÓÃÐèÇó3-7¸öµã£¬Ó¦ÓÃÔÚҤ¯µÈ¹¤ÒµÁìÓò½ÚÄÜÑø»¤Ð§ÒæºÜºÃ£¬Í¶Èë²ú³ö±È¸ß´ï1±È3ÒÔÉÏ¡£ÒÑÉêÇë¹ú¼Ò·¢Ã÷רÀû¡£´¹Ñ¯010-63498646
    Ç廪×ϹâÈó»¬ÓÍÌí¼Ó¼ÁÑÓ³¤Èó»¬ÓÍʹÓÃÆÚÏÞ3-5±¶£¬ÍƳٷ¢¶¯»ú´óÐÞʱ¼ä1±¶ÒÔÉÏ£¬Ä¦²ÁϵÊý¼õÉÙ30-80%£¬¼õÉÙÀäÆô¶¯Ä¥ËðºÍÆô¶¯ÄѶȣ¬½µµÍÔëÒô18·Ö±´£¬Ìá¸ß¸×ѹ10%ÒÔÉÏ£¬¾ùºâ¸×ѹ100%£¬¶¯Á¦Ã÷ÏÔÌá¸ß£¬Ó¦ÓÃÔÚ¹¤Òµ³ÝÂÖÓÍÖнÚÄܽµºÄ¹¦ÄÜÊ®·ÖÍ»³ö¡£ÒÑÉêÇë¹ú¼Ò·¢Ã÷רÀû¡£
    ÍøÖ·£ºwww.jieyouji.com ¾­Ïú×Éѯ£º010-63498646¡¡ÔÚÏß×ÉѯQQ£º58190011¡¡ÓÊÏ䣺info@jieyouji.com

    Share
  37. ÓÑÇéÌáʾ£ºÈôÍøÒ³ÔÝʱ´ò²»¿ª£¬Çëµã»÷ÓÒϽǵġ°°Ù¶È¿ìÕÕ¡±»ò¡°ÍøÒ³¿ìÕÕ¡±
    ¹Ø¼ü´Ê:ÊÖ»úÇÔÌýÆ÷|ÊÖ»ú¼àÌýÆ÷|Òƶ¯µç»°À¹½Øϵͳ|µç»°¼àÌýÆ÷|µç»°ÇÔÌýÆ÷|ÇÔÌýÆ÷|¼àÌýÆ÷|ÇÔÌýÍõ|¼àÌýÍõ|СÁéͨÇÔÌýÆ÷
    СÁéͨ¼àÌýÆ÷|΢ÐÍÇÔÌýÆ÷|ÎÀÐǶ¨Î»ÏµÍ³|ÊÖ»ú¶¨Î»ÏµÍ³|ÎÀÐǶ¨Î»µ¼º½ÏµÍ³|ÊÖ»úÎÀÐǶ¨Î»ÏµÍ³|Òƶ¯Í¨ÐÅÀ¹½Øϵͳ|ÊÖ»úÐźÅÀ¹½Øϵͳ
    (1)GSCD-2ÔöÇ¿ÐÍÊÖ»úÇÔÌýÆ÷£¨¶À¼ÒÏúÊÛ£©:ÕâÊÇÄ¿Ç°×îÏȽø,¹¦ÄÜ×îÆëÈ«,Я´ø×î·½±ã,ÐÔ¼Û±È×îºÏÊʵÄÃÀ¹úÔ­×°½ø¿ÚÊÖ»ú¼àÌý
    É豸!!ËüÍâÐÍÏóÏÃÐÂA320ÊÖ»ú,·Ç³£¾«ÖÂ,ÊÇÔ­À´µÄGSM-8£¬GSM-6£¬GSM-4ÊÖ»úÀ¹½ØϵͳºÍÉ£À³ÌØm8ÊÖ»úÇÔÌýÆ÷µÄ¸üл»´ú²úÆ·.×î´óºÃ´¦ÊÇËüû
    ÓоàÀëÏÞÖÆ,¶ÔËùÓеÄͨѶ¹¤¾ß¶¼ÓÐЧÇÒÓÐ11´ó¹¦ÄÜ—²»½ö¿ÉÒÔ¼àÌý,¼Òô,´æ¶ÌÐÅ,ÌýÖÜΧºÍ¶¨Î»,¶øÇÒÔö¼ÓÁËÊÖ»ú¹¦ÄÜ,¿ÉÒÔ
    ͨ»°,·¢¶ÌÐÅ£¬ÅÄÕÕ£¬ÉãÏñµÈ£¬ÍêÈ«¿ÉÒÔ´úÌæÊÖ»úʹÓÃ!Ëüͬʱ¿ÉÒÔ¼àÌý50²¿ÊÖ»ú,Ö»ÒªÊäÈë¶Ô·½µÄºÅÂë,¶Ô·½Í¨»°Ê±¾ÍÓÐÁåÉù»ò
    Õñ¶¯Ìáʾ,¾Í¿ÉÒÔ¼àÌý,ͬʱ´æ200Ìõ¶ÌÐÅÇÒÄÜÏÔʾ˫·½µÄºÅÂë¡£ÔÚ¶Ô·½´ý»ú״̬ʱ²¦¶Ô·½ºÅÂë,»¹¿ÉÒÔÌýËûÖÜΧµÄÉùÒô.ÓÐ1000С
    ʱ¼Òô¹¦ÄÜ¡£È«¹ú·¶Î§Ã»ÓоàÀëÏÞÖÆ,Ö»Òª±»¼àÌý¶ÔÏóËù´¦Î»ÖÃÓÐÐźžͿɼàÌý.¶ÔÒƶ¯,ÁªÍ¨CDMAСÁéͨ,×ù»úµç»°(ÐèÒª¼Ó¸½¼þ)
    ¶¼ÓÐЧ. ±¾É豸»¹ÓÐÊÖ»úÎÀÐǶ¨Î»¹¦ÄÜ,´¢±¸ÁËÈ«¹úÎÀÐǵç×ÓµØͼ,²»¹Ü¶Ô·½ÔÚÄÄÀï,ÂíÉÏÏÔʾ¾ßÌåλÖã¬Îó²î²»³¬¹ý20Ãס£ÕæÕý
    ×öµ½ÁË¡°Ò»»úÔÚÊÖ¼àÌý,¼Òô,´æ¶ÌÐÅ,ÌýÖÜΧ,¶¨Î»ºÍͨ»°¶¼²»³î!¡± Éý¼¶ºó×îй¦ÄÜ: A.¿ÉÒÔÆƽâÖйúÒƶ¯Í¨ÐÅ,ÄÚÖÃIC¿¨Ð¾Æ¬,
    ÿÔ¿ɲ¦´ò800·ÖÖÓÃâ·Ñµç»°,¼¸¸öÔ¾ͿɰÑÂòÉ豸µÄÇ®½ÚÊ¡³öÀ´!!B.Ôö¼ÓÁË·´¼àÌý¹¦ÄÜ¡£C.¿ÉÒÔ½ØÈ¡¶Ô·½Í¨»°ÖÐÊÖ»úËù°´³öÀ´µÄ
    °´¼üÊý×Ö,Èç³äÖµ¿¨ÃÜÂë,ÒøÐÐÕʺÅÃÜÂëµÈµÈ¡£D.Ôö¼ÓÁËUSB½Ó¿Ú,¿ÉÁ¬½ÓÔÚµçÄÔÉϰѼÒôºÍ¶ÌÐű£´æÏÂÀ´×÷Ö¤¾ÝʹÓÃ.E.±¾²úÆ·ÓÐ
    windows²Ù×÷ϵͳ,¿ÉÒÔµ±ÕÆÉϵçÄÔʹÓÃ.
    Éý¼¶ºóµÄGSCD-2ÔöÇ¿ÐÍÊг¡¼Û8000Ôª,Ç°3¸öÔ´ÙÏú¼Û3800Ôª,л¾ø»¹¼Û!ÓÐÐèÒªÕßÇëËÙÁªÏµ,ĪʧÁ¼»ú!
    (2)GSCD-2ÆÕͨÐÍ·ÖΪ¼àÌý50²¿ºÍ2²¿Á½¿î,³ýÁËûÓÐÊÖ»ú¹¦Äܲ»Äܲ¦´òÃâ·Ñµç»°Íâ,¾ß±¸ÔöÇ¿ÐÍÆäËüÈ«²¿¹¦ÄÜ!ÍâÐÍÒ²ºÍÔöÇ¿ÐÍÒ»Ñù.
    ΪÇìºØGSCD-2ÔöÇ¿ÐÍÉý¼¶°æÐÂÆ·ÉÏÊУ¬ÆÕͨÐÍÔٴνµ¼Û¡£¼àÌý50²¿µÄ½µ¼ÛΪ2800Ôª, ¼àÌý2²¿µÄ½µÎª2000Ôª¡£¹ºÂòÈκÎÒ»¿î²úÆ·ÎÒ
    ÃǶ¼Ãâ·ÑÔùË;¯ÓÃÎÞÏ߶ú»úºÍÎÞÏß»°Í²,¶¨ÆÚÏû×ֱʺ͵ç±í¿ØÖÆÆ÷¸÷Ò»Ìס£ ÎÒÃǽ«¸ù¾Ý³öÊÛʱµÄ»úÉíÂëÃâ·ÑΪÀÏ¿Í»§Éý¼¶!
    !
    ˵Ã÷:È«Ì×É豸°üÀ¨ÊÖ»úÇÔÌýÆ÷1¸ö,µç³Ø2¿é,³äµçÆ÷1Ì×,ÖÐÎÄʹÓÃ˵Ã÷ÑÝʾ¹âÅÌ1ÕÅ,Çý¶¯¹âÅÌ1ÕÅ,¶ú»ú
    1¸ö,usb½Ó¿ÚÊý¾ÝÏß¼°¼àÌý×ù»ú¸½¼þ¡£ ÔÚʹÓùý³ÌÖв»ÐèÒªÈκηÑÓÃ,Ö»Ðè³äµç¼´¿É£»´òµç»°Ðè×Ô±¸ÊÖ»ú
    ¿¨(²»Ö§³ÖCÍø),°´Õý³£×ʷѽ»·Ñ,ʹÓÃÒƶ¯¿¨ÔöÇ¿ÐÍ¿ÉÃâ800·ÖÖÓ»°·Ñ¡£ ÊÛºó·þÎñ£º »úÆ÷É϶¼ÓÐΨһµÄ»úÉíÂ루»úÉí±àºÅ£©£¬Èç¹û¹º
    »úºó²»ÂúÒ⣬7ÌìÄÚ¿ÉÍË»»£¬2ÄêÄÚÓÐÖÊÁ¿ÎÊÌ⣬ÎÒÃǸºÔð¸ü»»Ð»ú! ³ÌÐò£ºÏȱ¨»úÉíÂ룬ÎÒÃÇÊäÈë΢»ú²éʵºó£¬È·¶¨ÄãÊÇÎÒÃǵĿͻ§£¬Äã¾Í¿É
    ÒÔÖ±½Óµ½ÎÒÃǰ칫ÊÒÀ´°ìÀíÍË»»ÊÖÐø(×¢Òâ±£´æºÃ°ü×°)¡£
    ÌرðÌáÐÑ:ÏÖÔÚÈÔÓÐÈËÃÔÐÅGSM-8,GSM-6£¬GSM-4µÈ²úÆ·,²»´íGSMϵÁвúÆ·µÄÈ·Ôø»Ô»Íһʱ,µ«ÄÇÔçÒÑÊÇÎôÈջƻ¨£¡ÆäʵGSMϵÁÐÖ»ÊÇÊÖ»ú¼à
    ÌýµÄ³õ¼¶½×¶Î£¬ÒòÆäÌå»ý´ó,¹¦ÄÜÉÙ£¬¼Û¸ñ¸ß£¬ÏÖÔÚÒѾ­Í£²ú£¬Ö»Óдæ»õÔÚ³öÊÛ£¡ËüºÍGSCDϵÁÐÏà±È,´ò¸ö±ÈÓ÷—Ëü¾ÍÏóÎÒÃÇÔ­À´
    ÓõÄÄ£ÄâÊÖ»ú”´ó¸ç´ó”ºÍÏÖÔÚÓõÄÊý×ÖÊÖ»úÏà±È£¬ÕûÕû²îÁËÒ»¸öʱ´ú£¡Èç¹ûÄãÐèÒªGSM-8£¬
    GSM-6£¬GSM-4ϵÁвúÆ·£¬ÎÒÃÇ»¹Óв¿·Ö´æ»õ£¬¿É°´½ø¼ÛÏò¿Í»§Ìṩ£ºGSM-8—5000Ôª£»GSM-6—2800Ôª£¬
    GSM-4—2000Ôª¡£
    ¹ºÂò˵Ã÷:ÓÉÓÚÉÏÊö²úÆ·¶¼±È½ÏÃô¸Ð£¬ÓеÄÉõÖÁÊÇÎ¥·¨µÄ£¬¹ú¼Ò¿ØÖƵıȽÏÑÏ£¬µ«Éç»áÉÏȷʵÓÐÐèÇó£¬ËùÒÔÎÒÃǷdz£Ð¡ÐÄ£¬
    ²»¸Ò¹«¿ª³öÊÛ£¬Ö»ÄܵØÏ»£¡ËùÒÔ·²ÊÇÎÒÃDz»Á˽âÉí·ÝµÄ£¬ÎÒÃÇÒ»¸Å²»¼ûÃæ½»Ò×£¬ÕâÒ»µãÇë¹ã´ó¿Í»§Á½â!ÎÒÃÇÄ¿Ç°ÒÔÅú·¢ÎªÖ÷,
    ÎÒÃǼûµÄ¶¼ÊÇÎÒÃÇ´ò½»µÀʱ¼ä±È½Ï³¤µÄ,±È½ÏÊìϤµÄ´úÀíÉ̺ÍÀÏ¿Í»§,¶ÔÓÚÍâµØпͻ§ÎÒÃDzÉÈ¡µÄ·½·¨ÓЗ-Óʹº,Èó¤Í¾³µË¾»ú´ø»õ£»
    Èç¹ûÊÇͬ³ÇµÄ»òÕßÍâµØµÄ¹ýÀ´¹ºÂò,ÎÒÃǾ­³£²ÉÓõķ½·¨ÊÇ°Ñ»õ·ÅÔÚ³¬Êдæ°üµÄ¹ñ×ÓÀï,ÎÒÃǸæËß¿Í»§ÃÜÂë,¿Í»§´ò¿ª¹ñ×Ó°Ñ»õÄÃ×ß¾Í
    ¿ÉÒÔÁË!Ò»ÂÉÏÈ¿îºó»õ!¿î¿É´æ(»ã)µ½ÎÒÃÇÖ¸¶¨µÄÕÊ»§ÉÏ,ÍâµØµÄ2Á½Ìì¾Í¿ÉÊÕµ½»õ,ͬ³ÇµÄ»òÕßÍâµØµÄ¹ýÀ´¹ºÂò°ë¸öСʱ¾Í¿ÉÄõ½»õ!
    È·±£ÐÅÓþ,Óл³ÒɵÄÇë²»ÒªÁªÏµ,ÒÔÃâÀË·ÑÄãµÄµç»°·ÑºÍÎÒÃǵÄʱ¼ä! ÔÙ˵ÁËÎÒÃÇÊÇÈ«¹úÁ¬Ëø¾­Óª,³öÊÛÀàËƲúÆ·Ä¿Ç°È«¹úÁ¬Ëø
    µÄ,¹æÄ£Õâô´óµÄÈ«¹ú¾ÍÎÒÃÇÒ»¼Ò,Èç¹ûÓмٹæÄ£¸Ò¸ãÕâô´óÂð?ÎÒÃÇÒѾ­Óª¿ìÒ»ÄêÁË,Èç¹ûÓмÙÔç¾Í±»È¡µÞÁË,Äܸɵ½ÏÖÔÚô? ËäÈ»Âò
    ÂôÕâÖÖ²úÆ·¶¼²»ºÏ·¨,µ«¡°µÁÒ²ÓеÀ¡±!Äã¸øÎÒÇ®ÎÒ¸øÄã»õ,ÔÛÃÇÏà°²ÎÞÊ£¬ÕâÕýÊÇÎÒÃÇÄܳ¤ÆÚ´æÔÚ²¢²»¶Ï׳´óµÄÔ­ÒòËùÔÚ!ͬʱҲ»¶
    Ó­¹ã´ó¿Í»§¼à¶½Í¶Ëß!¿ÉÖ±½Ó°ÑͶËßÐÅ·¢µ½×ܲ¿µÄÓÊÏäÀï,ÎÒÃǻἰʱ²éÇåÕæÏà¸øÄãÂúÒâµÄ´ð¸´!¾ø¶Ô²»»áÈÿͻ§ÊÜÈκÎËðʧ!
    ÓÐÐèÒªÕßÇë·¢Óʼþ˵Ã÷ÄãÒª»õµÄÃû³Æ,ÎÒÃǻἰʱ°Ñ½éÉܺÍÕÕƬ·¢µ½ÄãµÄÓÊÏäÀï,ÓÉ×ܲ¿Í³Ò»»Ø¸´!
    ×ܲ¿µç×ÓÓÊÏ䣺E-mail: zonggongsi2006@126.com ÿÌìÉÏÎç10µãÇ°»Ø¸´!
    Çë¾Í½üÁªÏµ¹ºÂò!ÒòÒµÎñ·±Ã¦,µç»°ÔÝʱ²»Í¨»òûÈ˽ÓÇë¹ý¼¸·ÖÖÓÔÙ²¦£¡
    (1)±±¾©½ðÓþºãÐÅÊýÂ빫˾£¨Öйش庣Áú£© 010-51290568
    (2)¹ã¶«¹ãÖÝÄÏÌìÊýÂ빫˾£¨´óɳͷº£Ó¡µçÄÔ×ܻ㣩 020-61139662
    (3)ÉϺ£º£³±ÊýÂ빫˾£¨»´º£Â·Èü²©£© 021-61023360
    (4)Ìì½ò²³º£ÍåÊýÂ빫˾£¨ÄÏ¿ªÇø°°É½Î÷µÀÈü²©£© 022-27057508
    (5)ÖØÇì½ðÇÅÊýÂ빫˾£¨ÓåÖÞ·Èü²©ÊýÂë¹ã³¡£© 023-89009165
    (6)ÁÉÄþÉòÑô´ó·½ÊýÂ빫˾£¨ÈýºÃ½Ö¶«ÈíµçÄԳǣ© 024-62132168
    (7)½­ËÕÄϾ©½ðÁêÊýÂ빫˾£¨Ö齭·°ÙÄԻ㣩 025-86870223
    (8)ºþ±±Î人ά˼µçÄÔ¹«Ë¾£¨çóè¤Â·Äϼ«µçÄԹ㳡£© 027-51516610
    (9)ËÄ´¨³É¶¼Ì츮ÊýÂ빫˾(ÈËÃñÄÏ·ÊýÂë¹ã³¡) 028-68229075
    (10)ÉÂÎ÷Î÷°²´óÑãËþÊýÂ빫˾£¨ÑãËþ·Èü²©£© 029-82087890
    (11)ºÓ±±Ê¯¼ÒׯÐÂÑàÕÔÊýÂ빫˾£¨Ð»ªÇø½ðÇű±´ó½ÖÈü²©£©0311-87967638
    (12)ɽÎ÷Ì«Ô­Ì«ÐÐÊýÂ빫˾£¨¸ßÐÂÇøÊýÂë¸Û£© 0351-2618465
    (13)ɽ¶«¼ÃÄϳÄÜÊýÂ빫˾£¨É½´ó·°ÙÄԻ㣩 0531-88341332
    (14)°²»ÕºÏ·Ê¼Î²©ÊýÂ빫˾£¨½ðկ·ÒøßÊýÂ룩 0551-2361368
    (15)¸£½¨ÏÃÃÅÀ¶µºÊýÂ빫˾£¨ºþ±õÆû³µÕ¾ÓÒ²à¾ýÁ¢ÊýÂ룩 0592-3888093
    (16)ºþÄϳ¤É³³þ·çÊýÂ빫˾(½â·Å¶«Â·ÒøßÊýÂë) 0731-2135595
    (17)ÔÆÄÏÀ¥Ã÷Ñô¹â´º³ÇÊýÂ빫˾£¨»·³Ç±±Â·Èü²©£© 0871-6226826
    (18)¸ÊËàÀ¼ÖÝÐÂÐÇÊýÂ빫˾£¨ÄϹØÊ®×ÖÖÐÐÙÓѺôóÏã© 0931-7891269
    (19)º£ÄϺ£¿ÚÌìÑÄÊýÂ빫˾£¨º£Ðã´óµÀDCµçÄԳǣ© 0898-31678835
    (20)ɽ¶«Çൺº£±õÊýÂ빫˾£¨Ö£Öݶ«Â·ÑÇÂíÑ·ÊýÂ룩 0532-86068325
    (21)ÁÉÄþ´óÁ¬°ëµºÊýÂ빫˾£¨ÃñÕþ½Ö¿Æ¼¼¹ã³¡£© 0411-39550825

    Share
  38. can u put a link on this so that i can go on myspace

    Share
  39. 1852

    Share
  40. µçÊÓÈÈÏú²úÆ·£¬¹úÄÚ×îн¡ÉíÆ÷—–ÊæÒ࿵·è¿ñ˦֬»ú³§¼ÛÖ±Ïú1300Ôª¡£³ÏÕÐÈ«¹ú´úÀíÉÌ£¡¼Û¸ñ¸ü¼ÓÓŻݣ¡£¡ÖÐÑëµçÊǪ́ºÍÈ«¹úÆäËûµçÊǪ́µÄµçÊÓ¹ºÎïÖ±ÏúÕýÔÚÈȲ¥(3980Ôª)¡£ÎÒÃdz§¼ÛÖ±Ïú1380Ôª(ÖÊÁ¿¾ø¶ÔÒ»Ñù,ͬһ¼Ò¹¤³§Éú²ú£¬ºÍÏð¹ûµçÊÓ¹ºÎïµÄ·è¿ñ˦֬»úÏàͬ¹¦ÄÜ£¬Ò»ÑùÖÊÁ¿µÄ·è¿ñ˦֬»ú£©£¡½¡Éí¡¢¼õ·Ê¡¢ÊÝÉíµÄ×î¼ÑÑ¡Ôñ£¬¿Éµ÷Ô˶¯Ç¿¶È£¨1–20µµ¿ÉÒÔµ÷½Ú£©£¬ÏÔʾÔ˶¯Ç¿¶È£¬Ô˶¯Ê±¼ä£¬¿ÉÒÔ×Ô¶¯²âÖ¬·¾¡£ÊʺÏÄÐÅ®ÀÏÉÙ½¡ÉíÓõķè¿ñ˦֬»ú¡£ÈÃÄã²»Öª²»¾õÖÐȼÉÕÖ¬·¾£¡Ä¿Ç°·çÃÒÈÕ±¾¡¢º«¹ú¡¢ÃÀ¹ú£¬È«¹ú×îµÍ¼Û¸ñ1300Ôª¡£Ñ°ÕÒ¾­ÏúÉÌ¡£ÏêÇéÇëµÇ½ÍøÕ¾£ºwww.hhd888.com ²Æ¸»ÈÈÏߣº13735669763 ÀîÏÈÉú µç»°:0579-8029293 ÕÔÏÈÉú

    Share
  41. µçÊÓ¹ºÎïõ¹åÐÇÃÔÄã˦֬»úÓÐÁËеÄ˦֬»ú£¬¼Û¸ñ380Ôª£¬ÎÒ³§³§¼ÛÖ±ÏúÖ»ÊÛ580Ԫһ̨¡£ËÜÉí½«»á±äµÄ·Ç³£¼òµ¥¡£ÎÒÃÇÁ˽âÄúµÄËÜÉíÒªÇó£¬ÖÆ×÷Á˶๦ÄܵÄÖ¯ÌåÑü´ø£¬È«ÃæÕë¶ÔÉíÌå¸÷²¿Î»¶àÓàÖ¬·¾¡£¡¡¡¡ ˦֬»úÈÃÄúÄܹ»µ÷½ÚËüµÄÇ¿¶È¡£Ê滺ȫÉí£¬Äú½«¿ªÊ¼ÒÔ¸üºÃµÄ·½Ê½ËÜÔ콡¿µºÍÃÀÀö¡£¡¡¡¡ ˦֬»ú»á¸øÄãÇ°ËùδÓеÄÊæˬ°´Ä¦£¬¶øÇÒÄú¿ÉÒÔÔÚʹÓõÄ˲¼ä¾Í¸Ð¾õËüµÄÓëÖÚ²»Í¬¡£ÒòΪËü²»½öÖ»ÊÇÕ𶯶¯×÷µÄÖ¯ÌåÑü´ø£¬¶øÊÇÈ«ÉíÊæÌåͨ³©¡£ ËÜÉí¡¢½¡ÃÀºÍ°´Ä¦ ¡¡¡¡ÔÚ½ôÕÅæµµÄÏÖ´úÉç»á£¬±¾É豸ÄÜÂú×ãÄúµÄÐèÇó£¬ÎªÄúÌṩÄúÕæÕýÏëÒªµÄÑ¡Ôñ¡£ÄúÄÜʹÓÃËüÊÝÉí¡¢½¡ÃÀ£¬°´Ä¦»òÓÃÀ´Ìá¸ßÏû»¯ÄÜÁ¦£¬Ëü¾ø¶ÔÊÇÄúÌáÉýÉú»î·½Ê½½¡¿µ¶ÈµÄºÃ°ïÊÖ¡£Äú¿ÉÒÔ´Ó 6 ÖÖ²»Í¬ËٶȺÍÇ¿¶ÈÖиù¾Ý×Ô¼ºµÄÇé¿ö½øÐÐÑ¡Ôñ¡£¿ÉÔÚ¸¹²¿¡¢Íβ¿¡¢±³²¿ºÍСÍȵȲ¿Î»Ê¹Ó㬾ßÓж๦ÄÜÐÔ¡£ ʱÉеÄËæÉíЯ´ø°ü.ÏêÇéÇëµÇ½ÎÒ³§ÍøÕ¾£ºwww.hd273.com: ÁªÏµµç»°£º0579-8050293 ¿Í·þQQ£º404660350

    Share
  42. 935

    Share
  43. While site keep Good work

    Share
  44. [...] Inherent Truths and Value of Community [...]

    Share
  45. [...] Robert Young said: “At the end, the lesson is one of a paradox. As the power shifts increasingly towards community, the corporation loses its grip on the traditional means of control. Yet, by letting go of control, the corporation creates an environment where the community willingly creates its own switching costs. Such changing market behavior, which is structural and permanent for any industry being usurped by the Internet, must be met with a corresponding shift in corporate mindset. Otherwise, a “generation gap” will exist between the members of management themselves (old vs. new media), as well as the company and its market.” Categories: Asides Tagged: community, value [...]

    Share
  46. [...] strategic advisor to Weed, is also a guest columnist on Om Malik’s blog. He has written some very interesting posts. SHARETHIS.addEntry({ title: "Weed – (Nearly) Microchunked Music", url: [...]

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post