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Summary:

Wall Street Journal catches on to the trend that voice is being embedded in everything – from video games to instant messenger. This is only the start. Our friend Andy pretty much announced his engagement in the pages of WSJ.

Wall Street Journal catches on to the trend that voice is being embedded in everything – from video games to instant messenger. This is only the start. Our friend Andy pretty much announced his engagement in the pages of WSJ.

  1. Om, one of the downsides of voice everywhere is that when combined with the anonymity of the internet, people can voice their vitriol and hate mongering in real time, and still hide behind a screen name.

    For example, I let my 9 year old son play a PS2 game, Ratchet and Clank, online with a buddy of his. The online game has a voice option so we acquired a USB headset as well.

    My son and his friend picked up quickly that if no one knows who you are then you can say pretty much anything you want with impunity. They weren’t offensive but were definitely obnoxious and rude. The headset went away quickly after that.

    just my 2 cents.

    john

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  2. Jesse Kopelman Thursday, August 25, 2005

    The weird thing about voice and internet applications is that by its very nature the internet puts you in contact with people who don’t speak the same primary language. Usualy it is easier to communicate with such people via writing. Will embeded voice spark a renaisance in those who can speak several languages, or ultimately fail due to user laziness? Or is the whole thing moot as what people really want are “internets” instead of The Internet.

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  3. WSJ Article on VoIP Focuses on Embedded Voice in Applications

    I forgot to mention that yesterday’s Wall Street Journal had a free article called Talk of the Internet that surprisingly focused on computer applications that support voice communications between users. The article begins by describing how users of B…

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