3 Comments

Summary:

CNET has published the rarest of beasts, a hardware review that gets it right all the way through.  The review of the Toshiba Tecra M4 covers all the basics, specs, configuration, ports and screen, and they also do a very good job describing the shortcomings of […]

CNET has published the rarest of beasts, a hardware review that gets it right all the way through.  The review of the Toshiba Tecra M4 covers all the basics, specs, configuration, ports and screen, and they also do a very good job describing the shortcomings of the M4 (weight and screen glare) as well as who this Tablet PC is perfect for.  Good review and worth checking out if you are interested in the M4.  From the review:

With a silver lid and a black base, the Toshiba Tecra M4 convertible tablet looks right at home in the boardroom. It is solidly designed and loaded with features, but its 6.2-pound weight is a killer if you want to hold your tablet like a clipboard for any length of time. If you want a decent laptop with tablet functionality, the Tecra M4 provides top-notch performance, a comfortable keyboard, and a large 14-inch screen. If you’re looking for something to use primarily as a tablet, you’re better off with smaller devices such as the ThinkPad X41 or the Motion LE1600.

  1. I think the closest competitor to the M4 would be Fujitsu’s LifeBook 4020. It’d be nice to see a comparison there (given that lifebook is lighter and has better battery life). The biggest difference is that the 4020′s SXGA+ screen is only 12.1″ to M4′s 14.1″

    Share
  2. The editors gave it a low score (at least compared to other premium laptops) of 6.6. But they gave a much worse score to the R10/15 (4.9). The user ratings on that are much higher (8.4). I would expect to see the same trend with the M4′s user ratings.
    http://reviews.cnet.com/Toshiba_Satellite_R15_S822/4852-3126_7-31272309-2.html

    There is definitely a disconnect between CNET editors’ views and what the user community seems to want (mostly in terms of how important low weight is, I think).

    Of course, people who actually buy a product are more likely than the average person to _want_ that product (they bought it, after all). They know before they buy it how much it weighs and that the screen has very poor viewing from wide angles, so maybe those things don’t mean as much to them.

    So it looks like the pattern is: if you think you want a Tecra M4, you’ll love it, no regrets.

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post