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Summary:

Paul Kapustka says forget the Vonage blog, its time for an FCC blog. “One that should be a no-brainer, since it is our tax dollars that support the agency. Odds of it actually happening? You have a better chance of winning Lotto ….Why not create an […]

Paul Kapustka says forget the Vonage blog, its time for an FCC blog. “One that should be a no-brainer, since it is our tax dollars that support the agency. Odds of it actually happening? You have a better chance of winning Lotto ….Why not create an FCC blog, where the agency would be required to post attributable updates the minute any decision is made? Does the back-channel, anonymous-source routine help anyone except those with hidden agendas?”

  1. The French regulator, http://www.ART-Telecom.com has had ‘Le Blog’ since last december. It started to give out practical information on using the French Law (june 2004) that stipulates that cities and departments can deploy their own (FttX) networks.
    They now use it for up to date semi official information, disruptive postings etc. ‘Discours’ is a French word after all ;-)

    Le Blog: http://www.art-telecom.fr/dossiers/collectivites/blog/corps.php

    Google translation: http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.art-telecom.fr%2Fdossiers%2Fcollectivites%2Fblog%2Fcorps.php&langpair=fr%7Cen&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&prev=%2Flanguage_tools

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  2. This was tried, sort of, by Chairman Powell–who for a while posted to an Always On blog where he tried to give his version of events and thoughts into his decision-making process. Here is one problem that probably makes this either flat-out impossible or a useless tool–the idea that anything you say can be held against you in a court of law.

    Few industries are as litigious as the telecom industry, mostly because you can interpret the Telecom Act any which way you want to serve your purpose. Using information in a blog to get behind the veil of any FCC decision and especially the controversial ones (or the ones you really would be interested in) would be too easy for the General Counsel’s office to sanction. Therefore, the blog would look like every other press release that comes out of the FCC.

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  3. well, that was a bit of a joke i think. anyway its something the FCC is not going to do. they are too scared to be in touch with people who they represent.

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  4. You’re right, the FCC would never do this…and even if they did it would be as dry and full of legalese as a tariff.

    Martin Tibbitts

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