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Summary:

Tom’s Hardware has taken a look at the DocuPen R700 mobile scanner that is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the smallest scanner in the world. The pen scanner has 2 MB of on-board memory and uses USB to transfer scanned pages to […]

Docupen-handTom’s Hardware has taken a look at the DocuPen R700 mobile scanner that is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the smallest scanner in the world. The pen scanner has 2 MB of on-board memory and uses USB to transfer scanned pages to the computer as well as charge the unit. The review has some photos and a video of the DocuPen in action and some scan quality comparisons. If you are looking for a mobile scanner I don’t think you can get smaller than this so check out the review. You will find a lot of DocuPen videos on the DocuPen web site.

  1. I have a client who bought one of these. An extreme amount of patience is necessary to use it, but it does a decent job of scanning and you are correct — I don’t think you can find a smaller unit.

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  2. If I’m not mistaken, with this scanner you have to connect back to a desktop/notebook via USB. This is cumbersome and limits the true portability/usability of it.

    For several years now, I’ve been using

    http://www.wizcomtech.com/Wizcom/products/product_info.asp?fid=101

    It has several advantages:

    1) OCR is done in the device itself

    2) You can IR the OCRed text to anything that can accept a textfile beam (well, except for PPCs, of course — they want Peacemaker Pro; thanks MS!)

    3) I’ve gotten recognition as high as 99% depending on the typeface

    4) In a pinch, you can clean up the text on the device itself (it has a 4-line screen), although this is very painful to do

    I’ve literally scanned several *megabytes* of stuff over these past several years. I wouldn’t be without this unit.

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  3. The speed of the Docupen versus the pen scanner is much faster.

    Also you only need to plug the docupen in when you need to transfer.

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  4. Yeah, but I want to transfer *immediately* and *where I am*. I don’t want to scan pages and pages out of, say, a library reference book only to get home and find out I have 30% of it intelligible. With the QLP, I can scan and proof *on the spot.*

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