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Summary:

Google Maps mash-ups are becoming all the rage, thanks to caffeine fueled geeks. What’s most interesting is the many forms these mash-ups are taking. In Vancouver, they are using GMaps to search wireless-enabled cafes. Glenbrook Networks has launched a new mash-up that marries jobs with Google […]

Google Maps mash-ups are becoming all the rage, thanks to caffeine fueled geeks. What’s most interesting is the many forms these mash-ups are taking. In Vancouver, they are using GMaps to search wireless-enabled cafes. Glenbrook Networks has launched a new mash-up that marries jobs with Google maps. (Excellent!) Folks at MetroFreeFi.com have unleashed a GMap of wireless hot-spots in cities like San Francisco, Seattle, Chicago and New York.

Esme should be really happy with this development. I love this Mash-up which focused on rental/sales of real estate in the San Francisco Bay Area. Talk about unintended circumstances. I think Google did not plan it this way, but it happened.

By the way, here is an easy guide to building your won GMap mash-up. Google has finally released an API for developers to use the maps without hacking them. Ryan MacCarthy writes and explains, “With Google’s new API, there is likely to be a lot more innovation from a lot more people now that the platform has opened up. MetroFreeFi is one of the first web sites to use the new API in large scale (as opposed to smaller, experimental efforts)… “

Ryan posted a synopsis of the same though on Slashdot, which points to other mash-ups like chicago crime. EVDO Coverage had a neat one on congestion on EVDO networks (already… looking pretty bad!)

  1. Where do you want to go today?

    Om Malik comments on the increasing number and diversity of mash-ups based on Google Maps. Having a single standard map format that includes both 2-d and satellite photos opens up all sorts of possibilities, especially if GPS systems were to…

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  2. [...] mashup Blogged under Interest by Jeff Clavier on Wednesday 6 July 2005 at 2:04 am Om Malik has pointed this morning to a few applications using Google Maps to geolocate “st [...]

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  3. [...] the bandwagon with this Google Maps hijacking guide. (Warning: Some HTML skill involved) | Via Om Malik’s Broadband Blog |

    This entry was poste [...]

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  4. [...] the bandwagon with this Google Maps hijacking guide. (Warning: Some HTML skill involved) | Via Om Malik’s Broadband Blog |

    This entry was poste [...]

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  5. [...] the bandwagon with this Google Maps hijacking guide. (Warning: Some HTML skill involved) | Via Om Malik’s Broadband Blog |

    This entry was poste [...]

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  6. Om,

    Coming back at this from a post I just put up on Mobile Weblog concerning the future of mobile devices and how location based services are going to play such a substantial role in our mobile future. I linked back from here to here because of your collection of Google Maps Mash Ups that can help illustrate how a flexible API can allow for some very useful and tremendously creative applications to be developed.

    Thanks,

    Oliver Starr
    Mobile Weblog

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  7. Gerald Henderson Tuesday, February 21, 2006

    I was doing some research on google maps and found your blog! Very interesting information by the way. I am interested in learning more about the maps, as well as ajax programming. During my search, I also came across a site you have not mentioned that you may find interesting. It is called http://www.joemap.com. It is unlike these other google map mash-ups that I’ve seen in that it allows you to link and email maps to people like this: http://www.joemap.com/map50.html

    Anyway, thanks for all your info, and I hope you find this interesting!

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  8. Donkey Magic is a great tool for making Google mashups. It has proved invaluable to me in my own mashup of Google maps and Google videos, Virtual Tourism

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  9. If you’re interested in mashups, try this new site: http://www.stickymap.com

    We developed Stickymap to make an interesting use of graphical overlays as well as a wiki-style interface so that you can get a good sense of what’s going on in a well-markered city.

    Right now, I think the northeast has a good amount of markers. I invite you all to post areas in your neighborhood, or areas that you’ve visited or know about.

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