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Summary:

A lot of noise around Microsoft losing traction at Telstra this morning, including my own summation of events. Ed Graczyk, director of marketing for the Microsoft TV, tells TelecomWeb: “They had decided not to move forward to the (IPTV) trial program because of issues that are […]

A lot of noise around Microsoft losing traction at Telstra this morning, including my own summation of events. Ed Graczyk, director of marketing for the Microsoft TV, tells TelecomWeb: “They had decided not to move forward to the (IPTV) trial program because of issues that are totally unrelated to Microsoft TV.” He points out that Telstra’s network is not reading to support the IPTV right now. “They expected that their network upgrades would be further along than they really are… They’re not ready to do a trial.” Telstra spokesperson says if and when ready, they will include Microsoft in their plans. “If and when we make a decision to offer an IPTV service, from a commercial and technical perspective, Microsoft’s platform would be one of a number of serious options,” the spokesperson told C/Net.

By Om Malik

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  1. Any of us who deal with Telstra in Australia would have known that the network has nowhere near the capability of running IPTV. Telstra is currently hamstrung by a terrible services division that is the result of redundancies in favour of subcontracting. Pride in the workmanship is gone and it has been replaced with guys who get paid flat rates to do things and so they hustle.

    Until Telstra get their “Fibre to the door” programme launched in a few years time the notion of any enhanced IP-based services are a dream for them. Sol Trajillo has his work cut out for him.

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  2. It’s worth noting that there are some other early entrants in the IPTV market. Whilst it appears to be mostly service-by-press-release atm, Adam Internet (a small-ish South Australian DSL Provider who’s rolled out some of its’ own DSL infrastructure) is talking up a service they’re providing in partnership with a group called MoviesOnline, who will provide (according to their slightly vapor-wareish website) “libraries of Australian television and documentary content, adult, foreign language and most importantly … latest release Hollywood movies.”
    Moviesonline don’t mention anything about the platform they’ll be delivering this service over, but I thought I’d throw this information in to the pol for those who are interested.

    LG

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  3. another comment: Telstra is one of the telco’s that also owns a cable provider. Therefore, they are already in the TV business and have less urgency like other telco’s to enter it.
    Andreas

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