1 Comment

Summary:

I really used to enjoy Jonathan Schwartz and his “different” ideas. But then he got came under the influence of the jocks, lost some of his originality and well became too corporate. Today, he reminded me why I liked him in the first place – straight […]

I really used to enjoy Jonathan Schwartz and his “different” ideas. But then he got came under the influence of the jocks, lost some of his originality and well became too corporate. Today, he reminded me why I liked him in the first place – straight talking, far seeing and politically incorrect. Today he reminds us why India and China are actually blessed because they are not tied to legacy IT infrastructure and can use commoditized technologies to get to upto speed. “There are no mainframes. Microsoft Exchange doesn’t have the same presence in the IT landscape. Windows isn’t nearly no entrenched. You can’t huddle in Mountain View and expect to be able to understand the market in China, You have to be there.”

The Register writes that “India and China could well dominate something Schwartz sees as the next-wave of computing, which is a scenario that takes millions of networked devices, high bandwidth and web services for granted. While the US is busy paying cheap coders to fix PeopleSoft applications, savvy folks in India could be plowing ahead on a fresh infrastructure.

  1. Tabitha McNerney Tuesday, April 26, 2005

    Why does the author of the article referred to at the Register state the following? Is she just in a state of denial (notice that Ashlee is reporting from San Francisco)?

    ——————————————
    Where the rest of us dream of sugarplum fairies, Schwartz tends to get lost in visions of device-rich networks and dancing web services. It’s a sickness that consumes many Sun executives as they try to own a chunk of the next big computing buy. It’s this mentality that makes Sun staffers talk in such flowery language about a “networked India” or “web service-centric China.”

    Will the next Google or Napster or Salesforce.com come out of Beijing while US staffers are busy installing the latest Windows Service Pack? Probably not in the near future. But we’ll chat again in ten years.
    ——————————————

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post