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“I don’t understand 50-year old executives who want to play Golf all day.” Pierre Lamond, Sequoia Capital. “You know, when a man is successful, has made money, what he is looking for is his Legacy.” Jim Hogan, Telos Venture Partners With all the brouhaha around new […]

  • “I don’t understand 50-year old executives who want to play Golf all day.” Pierre Lamond, Sequoia Capital.
  • “You know, when a man is successful, has made money, what he is looking for is his Legacy.” Jim Hogan, Telos Venture Partners

With all the brouhaha around new start-ups and opening up of the funding spigot, Sramana Mitra wonders where are Silicon Valley’s A-Team. Most of the executives who have made their bones in previous lives are staying out of the game for now, patiently waiting for the next big idea, a “legacy defining moment.”

The bulk of the opportunities out there, however, are, for example, a CEO job at one of 600+ Security companies, where the best exit one can hope for is becoming a feature in the larger offering of a Symantec or a McAfee. Not terribly inspiring, is it? Even though, there is a bit of money to be made, it certainly doesn’t qualify as a Legacy-building opportunity.And with these little businesses, the CEO is effectively a glorified VP of Sales, another uninspiring little detail.

I agree with Mitra to a large extent. I think most of the current class of start-ups are niche companies and one cannot really blame for successful CEOs for improving their handicap.

  1. Provided that they get the right level of support, that might allow the next generation of great CEOs to have a shot at leading interesting companies ?

    Greetings from Paris :-).

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  2. paris in spring and still blogging. jeff… that’s not good.

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