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Summary:

T-Mobile (Europe) is impressed with the results of its Flarion OFDM trials. According to Unstrung, T-Mobile’s VP of RAN Engineering, Klaus Juergen Krath, claims that the trial achieved average data downlink speeds of 1.5 Mbit/s with a peak of 3.2 Mbit/s. Average uplink speeds were 500 […]

T-Mobile (Europe) is impressed with the results of its Flarion OFDM trials. According to Unstrung, T-Mobile’s VP of RAN Engineering, Klaus Juergen Krath, claims that the trial achieved average data downlink speeds of 1.5 Mbit/s with a peak of 3.2 Mbit/s. Average uplink speeds were 500 kbit/s, reaching peaks of 900 kbit/s. Average latency was approximately 30 milliseconds.

“It proved the high performance and low latency of the system,” said Krath. “User experience is very close to the wired LAN… There was no problem at all; the system was very stable and there was no unexpected outage.”

This could be shot in the arm for Flarion, which had been left twisting in the wind when its first like US major customer Nextel got snapped up by Sprint. The big question is will they place an order for gear, and bring it stateside. Lets hope they do for Flarion technology is pretty neat.

  1. Flarion OFDM only had one trial run here in central North Carolina with Nextel Broadband. When Sprint snapped up Nextel, that was shut down.

    Sprint and Verizon are pushing EVDO, and Cingular is moving toward HSDPA, with T-Mobile trailing behind. How is Flarion going to get any traction in America without backing from a major carrier? Muni broadband? Somehow I doubt that.

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  2. i believe they are working with some of the smaller carriers in US. like the one down in texas. i forget their name. clearly they are challenged in the US, but overseas at least there is some hope

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  3. Well, let’s take the details of the “TMobile Praises Flarion” article and analyze them. 220 Friendly enterprise users, distributed into 18 base stations. If one assume even the worst case of single-sector bts and 20% active users at any one time, this means 2.4 users per bts at any given time. Given this light loading and virtually no interference, this performance is neither surprise nor proof of commercial viability. Let’s see it in a dense urban environment with 10k users. I hope we get to see the day….

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  4. actually, they perform quite well even in dense situations. they had a really good trials in the US in the North Carolina’s Chapel Hill area. I think they compare much more favorably with say HSDPA or CDMA which need many more base stations and cannot gurantee the speeds.

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