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Summary:

Gear Live is always finding cool stuff and these chainless bicycles from Dynamic Bicycles are just awesome.  The bikes utilize a driveshaft system that is totally enclosed in the tubes of the bike and the gears are all in the hub.  Since there is no chain […]

Dynamic_bikeGear Live is always finding cool stuff and these chainless bicycles from Dynamic Bicycles are just awesome.  The bikes utilize a driveshaft system that is totally enclosed in the tubes of the bike and the gears are all in the hub.  Since there is no chain there is no grease to get all over your clothes and you won’t get caught in the chain while riding.  More importantly it means you can switch gears while stopped meaning you can always start in the gear you want.  Now this is pure mobile tech.  $579 – $749.

  1. I just wanted to point out that the chain more efficiently transfers the energy from the pedals to the rear wheel than a set of angular gears and shafts can.

    This is why sport motorcycles always use chains. or a similar setup. Some motorcycles do use shafts but they are less concerned with accelleration performance.

    On pedal power, I’d expect you to be extremely concerned with how efficient the bike was for road riding, and less so for harsh environments where the maintainability of the shaft might weigh in more.

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  2. The idea of a shaft drive with internal gears interests me. It seems that on the various bicycle forums everyone has an opinion, mostly negative, about these bikes, but none have ever owned one. I’d like to read from riders of the experiences and opinions of those who have actually owned them.
    I’ve often wondered why this type of bicycle never became popular. It would appear that a drive shaft would be the ideal means of power transmission from pedal to multi-speed hub. I’ve owned both chain drive and shaft drive Honda motorcycles, and can’t imagine why anyone would choose the hassles of a chain over the shaft. In searching the web it appears that most of the shaft drive bicycles that are available are made in China, as many other bikes are too, but few shops sell the direct drives. There must be some tremendous disadvantage to them, but I can’t see what it would be for the average cyclist. From my experience with motorcycles, it would be nice never to have to think about cleaning lubing and replacing worn chains, replacing worn cogs and chainwheels, and the constant maintenance required.

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  3. i would like to know more about this technology.this is a great technology advancement.bikes with no chain ,no grease and no breakdown thats great.

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  4. Dave Walkerden Sunday, July 31, 2005

    Shaft drive bicycles have been produced as far back as 1910 and employed the same design as they do today. The power losses most cyclists talk about are losses that affect Kw of power and rise with pedal RPM’s. Since most recreational cyclists use a low cadence and rely on torque, the losses are undetectable to the casual cyclist. The same is true with motorcyclists, though shaft driven bikes with rear suspension will rise and fall under power on/off and affect handling. This is why few sportbikes use shafts, not because of power losses. Lord knows power is rarely a problem for a 1200cc streeter. (see Yamaha V-Max)

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  5. I own a shaft bike, type Biomega Amsterdam, of Danish Biomega. I would like to say that I am far from being a recreational cyclist. and use the bike as a transport around Copenhagen after hours. (I take train to and from work). Before I purchased this bike I owned a Dutch Classic Gazelle with 5-gear internal gear hub and fully covered chain. My Biomega has a 7-gear internal hub from SRAM, aluminium frame and disc brakes forward as well as drum brakes rear.
    This bike is very challenging and personally I experience a constant urge to ride faster. It is also easier to ride up the bridge. Overall feeling is that the bike is much faster then what I had before. Actually that Dutch Gazelle Primeur was stolen and that was why I decided to go for a chainless.

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  6. By the way I think that exterior of the Dynamic Bicycles sucks… Biomega is on the front edge of exterior design as usual.

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  7. If you or I owned a bike shop, and got a substantial volume of trade in repairs and parts, mostly in relation to the chain and gears, would you or I really want to sell something that doesn’t have a chain and exposed gears to be repaired or replaced ?

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  8. John is right, the commercial failure of shaft-drive bikes is the result of an insidious conspiracy involving a powerful cabal of bicycle shop owners and the chain industry!

    Seriously, shaft-drive bikes have appeared and disappered since the early 1900′s, if they offered any compelling advantages over chain drive you would be sure the marketplace would embrace them.

    Personally, I would love to see a belt drive system to displace chains; it would utilize a variable-sized pulley to change gear ratios and a belt tensioner.

    And if you are having hassles with ‘grease’ on your chain you are either overlubing the thing or should get a chain enclosure.

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  9. Hi jk!

    You claim that the shaft drive is totally enclosed in the tubes of the bike. Not so! Well at least not in the frame tubes. On the Zero/Dynamic, the shaft is enclosed in its own dedicated tube. Current BMW motorcycle technology encloses the drive shaft in the swinging rear arm: that is seriously cool, but would require the inclusion of a universal joint.

    What is all this obsession with mechanical “efficiency”? The everyday bike is involved in a constant trade-off between efficiency and convenience: upright posture, no toeclips or SPDs, heavier frame and components, chain cases, mudguards etc.

    All the best

    Rob

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  10. Hi jk!

    You claim that the shaft drive is totally enclosed in the tubes of the bike. Not so! Well at least not in the frame tubes. On the Zero/Dynamic, the shaft is enclosed in its own dedicated tube. Current BMW motorcycle technology encloses the drive shaft in the swinging rear arm: that is seriously cool, but would require the inclusion of a universal joint.

    What is all this obsession with mechanical “efficiency”? The everyday bike is involved in a constant trade-off between efficiency and convenience: upright posture, no toeclips or SPDs, heavier frame and components, chain cases, mudguards etc.

    All the best

    Rob

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