Summary:

Why is that some of the remotest places in US get some of the coolest technology? I have seen fiber networks in places where you can only find domestic beer, while in other remote hamlets, I have enjoyed a bandwidth gusher unmatched by urban America. I […]

moxi remote and boxWhy is that some of the remotest places in US get some of the coolest technology? I have seen fiber networks in places where you can only find domestic beer, while in other remote hamlets, I have enjoyed a bandwidth gusher unmatched by urban America. I remember Manhattan (no not the real one!) where broadband wireless was the only way to connect (though sadly Monet Mobile is long gone to the big spectrum exchange up in the sky!) And now comes news that Digeo, makers of an ultra cool set-top box, Moxi has signed a deal with Comcast and will be the set-top box of choice in Huntsville, Alabama.

Digeo has licensed its technology to Motorola Broadband which is making these boxes, and will be the primary supplier to Comcast. If you remember, Comcast and Motorola recently inked a $1 billion dollar deal. Look at all the goodies crammed into this box – an internal hard drive, a personal video recorder – and the brilliant user interface. (I wrote about that in my Business 2.0 column, ConvergeSense!) As an aside, I wrote about Moxi, back in the day when Red Herring was still around, and well, Steve Perlman of Rearden Steel and WebTV fame was still running the company he started. (Don’t ask what happened next!)

Comcast will deploy 40,000 of these dual-tuner DVR (digital video recorder), HDTV (high definition television) boxes. Charter Communications had placed an order for 100,000 Motorola built boxes with Moxi. The service is being commercially launched in Rochester, Minn. Later Digeo and Adelphia Communications announced plans to deploy 25,000 Moxis. 2005 is shaping up to be a big year for Moxi set-top box, and it won’t be long before you can see these guys leap-up the PVR charts. Steve Hamm over at Business Week writes, “The Digeo people melded the two technologies and came up with something that is at the same time simple and full-featured. Quite a trick. Moxi combines digital video recording, TV programming, HDTV, video on demand, DVD player, music jukebox, photo galleries, games, and, soon, the ability to receive and make phone calls. It can also be used as a home networking hub. Right now, Digeo offers one- and two-TV packages, and, next year, it will be available in a four-TV package.” I am glad to hear that I wasn’t the only one impressed by the UI. Mr. Hamm who has seen many a start-up come and go agrees.

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