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Summary:

Never mind the lawsuits and other pesky issues – Vonage is growing like crazy. It is adding employees like wild mushrooms after a monsoon rain. The company says it has outgrown its Edison, NJ digs and will be moving to a new office in Holmdel, NJ. […]

Never mind the lawsuits and other pesky issues – Vonage is growing like crazy. It is adding employees like wild mushrooms after a monsoon rain. The company says it has outgrown its Edison, NJ digs and will be moving to a new office in Holmdel, NJ. The company plans to hire another 1000 employees by the end of the year. The irony of the move should not be lost on anyone – Holmdel is where AT&T and other Bell employees make home. Jeffrey Citron in jest had told me earlier this year, “We are one communications company hiring in NJ when others are laying off people.”

“It should be especially exciting for residents of Holmdel and Monmouth County municipalities who formerly worked for AT&T, Lucent, Agere and Avaya, many of who are still looking for employment in the telecom industry,” Holmdel Mayor Larry Fink told Ashbury Park Press. “That might bode well for them.” Former AT&T employees are loving the idea of Vonage move to their county, according to this report.

  1. This building – Prudential Insurance – is about 5 1/2 miles from AT&T’s South Jersey consolidated R&D center in Middletown, where a lot of the CallVantage product work takes place. It’s also about 3 1/2 miles from the old AT&T Holmdel lab. The Holmdel lab went to Lucent when AT&T split up. That building, parking lot, and access roads had a distinct look and is easily spottable on satellite maps of the area.

    The old AT&T Holmdel building probably housed around 5,000 people at one time. The AT&T Middletown (to become SBC Middletown?) building was built up as a state of the art facility with private offices for all, group kitchens, and tons of collaboration space. It had numerous service facilities to compete with the excesses of the dot.com niceties.

    Sadly, one of the characteristics of both Holmdel and Middletown these days is the ease of finding a parking space, the hollow sound of the corridors, and the no-waiting Aramark lunch rooms.

    Will centrally managed ITSP services suffer the same fate as the dinosaur telcos? I think so – and it will be much quicker.

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