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Summary:

The world is finally going flat – that is Flat TV. Falling prices combined with digital convergence is going to boost the sales of LCD television in 2005. The prices are going to decline by as much as 60%, and the demand will continue to grow […]

lcdtv.jpgThe world is finally going flat – that is Flat TV. Falling prices combined with digital convergence is going to boost the sales of LCD television in 2005. The prices are going to decline by as much as 60%, and the demand will continue to grow 40% per annum through 2007, according to Corning, which makes glass for these LCD displays. LCD TV’s comprised 5 percent of all televisions sold in 2004 and the company expects they will reach 10 percent market penetration in 2005. Corning believes that LCD TV’s may account for around 21 percent of the world’s television sales in 2007. Televisions with screen sizes below 40″ (measured diagonally) are expected to represent more than 90 percent of all units that will be sold through 2007. While this segment is currently dominated by CRT’s, it is the prime target for LCD TV penetration.

The price of liquid-crystal display TVs fell between 30 percent and 50 percent last year – with the larger screens dropping more – a decline that will likely be repeated in 2005, said Douglas Woo, president of Westinghouse Digital Electronics. Westinghouse introduced a 27-inch LCD TV for $2,499 last January. It sells for $1,299 today. A 37-inch LCD TV that cost $7,000 a year ago now sells for about $3,000, said Sean Wargo, director of industry analysis at the Consumer Electronics Association, the Arlington Va., manufacturers’ trade group.(Associated Press)

“As CRT TV’s continue to decline in market penetration, we believe LCD TV will emerge as the primary alternative technology in the below 40-inch market, as they provide the best balance of form, function and cost,” said Peter F. Volanakis, president of Corning Technologies. You can see why. In recent days Viewsonic and Syntax Group have released highly affordable LCD televisions. Viewsonic’s N2750, a sleek 27-inch-TV is a mere $999 while Syntax has released a whole slew of TVs in the $1000-$1500 price range.

Boston.com has an excellent primer on all digital technologies making inroads into our living rooms. It describes the difference between LCD TV and Plasma screens.

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  1. John DeRosa Tuesday, May 24, 2005

    I am trying to find out how many TV’s are sold annually in the US..I seem to recall reading roughly 33MM per year.

    How many 35″ and bigger?

    How many 25″ to 34″?

    How many 13″ to 24″?

    Can you help or know where to send me?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

  2. you might want to try out the consumer electronics association for that information – its on their website i think

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