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Summary:

It is not OS X but Emulators Online has Mac OS 8.1 running successfully on a Sony Vaio U750P.  The emulator is free but I don’t think the touchscreen will work using this emulator as there is no Mac support for the digitizer.  It is pretty […]

It is not OS X but Emulators Online has Mac OS 8.1 running successfully on a Sony Vaio U750P.  The emulator is free but I don’t think the touchscreen will work using this emulator as there is no Mac support for the digitizer.  It is pretty cool if not particularly useful, as these types of things usually are.

Sonyumac

(via UAddict)

  1. *gasp*! I hadn’t even considered older versions of Mac OS! Can he even do WiFi with that?! Bluetooth?!

    jk, you must follow up!

    Hmmmm… older Mac OS on an OQO?!!?

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  2. Mike, check out the website I mentioned- they have complete info about the emulation. I don’t know offhand about WiFi or BT. From an application standpoint I’m not sure how useful an old Mac OS would really be.

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  3. Dammit, jk, you caught me not reading!

    Just went there and was heartbroken to find out it is really just 68xxx emulation and can only go as high as Mac OS 8.x.

    Although I myself stopped at OS 6, somehow running something so *old* on a U or OQO seems yicky (that’s a technical term!). I’m also not sure I could get much use out of it. Ah, but if the touchscreen worked, MacDraw would be a killer on it! (R.I.P. MacDraw. You provided many hours of lucrative corporate labor in those pre-PowerPoint/Persuasion days!)

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  4. I’m the person who runs Emulators Online (http://www.emulators.com) and who runs Mac OS on the Sony VAIO U750. I picked it up almost 6 months ago when I also purchased the slightly larger Sony VAIO T series machine (which does have the keyboard and a DVD burned built in).

    From a practical point of view, the U750 is extremely easy to carry around. I motorcycle a lot, so being able to just pop a computer into my jacket and zip it up is incredible. Prior to the U750, I used to own the original Sony VAIO Picturebook notebook, which is larger than the U750 but smaller than today’s T series, and it served me well at the time (2000 through 2004, running Windows XP on a 600 MHz Transmeta Crusoe processor, but no CD or DVD or build-in wireless). It was a slow machine, so when I felt like lugging the backpack, I carried either my Dell Inspiron 8100 or my Dell D800 Centrino. Neither is a light notebook.

    Having 802.11g wireless available in my pocket, being able to stop at any wireless hotspot and quickly check email, instant message friends, check doppler radar and weather reports (which matter when you’re riding a few hundred miles on a bike) is a godsend. Being able to carry it to a baseball game, to a meeting a work, to dinner, etc. without obviously lugging around a large laptop is also great. My Sony U750 is as ubiqitous now as my cell phone or wallet – I carry it everywhere. And pop in the USB GPS receive, boot up MapPoint, and I’ve got GPS navigation.

    As far as Mac OS 8.1, sure, it’s a bit of a gimmick to have taken that picture of Mac OS 8.1 running on the U750. The point was, that you CAN.

    The T series is far better suited for emulating the Mac and running Mac OS 8.1, since it has a keypad for the mouse, and it has the DVD drive to read Macintosh CD-ROMs. Yes, you can download files using the 802.11g to the VAIO, have the files visible directly to the Mac OS (the emulators supports essentially shared folders that are visible to both Windows and the Mac OS), and you can then party on the files using your favourite version of Mac Photoshop, Mac Word, Illustrator, etc.

    Mac OS 8.1 being old, sure. You gotta remember I wrote these emulators in the early 1990’s and had Mac OS running on the PC as far back as 1993. Mac OS 8.1 _was_ new in 1998, and when the VAIO shipped in 2000 and I was exhibiting my product at Macworld Expo and COMDEX, I sold a lot of product based solely on the ability to run Mac OS 8.1 on small tiny computers (which Apple had yet to release by then). When I exhibited at Macworld Expo Tokyo in Japan in early 2001, I sold about $15,000 worth of emulators during the 3 days after parading around the show floor with Mac OS running on a 2.2 pound notebook computer. Not bad for 3 days work

    Small notebook computers are the wave of the future. Just as pagers gave way to today’s camera cell phones, the all-in-one pocket Windows computer, when the price drops to well below $1000 to be affordable by most people, will be the notebook computer of choice I believe.

    – Darek

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