Summary:

Al Hammond, a senior scientist with the World Resources Institute, a D.C. think tank, got so frustrated with his dial-up connection in Chestertown, that he decided to do something about it – set-up a wireless high speed Internet access provider called, Bay Broadband. The game plan […]

Al Hammond, a senior scientist with the World Resources Institute, a D.C. think tank, got so frustrated with his dial-up connection in Chestertown, that he decided to do something about it – set-up a wireless high speed Internet access provider called, Bay Broadband. The game plan is to bring high speed net to nearly 250,000 residents of Maryland’s shorelines and rural areas. Most rural areas are largely underserved,” Hammond told the Baltimore Business Journal. “Wireless is the obvious way to serve a dispersed market.” Maryland Technology Development Corp. study says that more than 65 percent of Eastern Shore businesses surveyed still access the Internet with a dial-up connection. Verizon spent over $405 million in 2002 and has tried to improve the service but still cannot meet up with demand. There is not much in the article in terms of technical details, except some businesses who switched are seeing their Internet costs drop by two thirds to about $200 a month. I suspect they are using some sort of fixed wireless technology.

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