14 Comments

Summary:

All the noise around fiber to the home might have drowned out the announcements made by QBit, a Bethesda, MD.-start-up that claims to have developed technology that allows phone companies to transmit HDTV signals over copper. The company is backed by former Apple CEO John Sculley. […]

All the noise around fiber to the home might have drowned out the announcements made by QBit, a Bethesda, MD.-start-up that claims to have developed technology that allows phone companies to transmit HDTV signals over copper. The company is backed by former Apple CEO John Sculley. Apparently the company has come up new compression techniques, which is drawing skepticism from industry insiders and experts. The company claims it can now do 10-to-1 lossless compression and will soon be able to do 32-to-1 compress. What that essentially means, an HDTV signal stream which needs about 20 megabits per second to stream, will essentially take 2 megabits per second, good enough to send over a 6 megabit ADSL signal. That reduces the need for deploying expensive fiber.

QBit calls its compression technique Z-Image Lossless Image Compression, which means they can stream DVD quality video without a problem. The company will introduce Z Audio, which can be used for any audio technology, including cellular phones, .WAV files or MP3 players reports Telephony. “Our audio codec technology, which is about a month behind the Z image, outperforms all of the top 10 industry codecs that are out there today by about 200%,” said Chief executive Dan Kilbank.

“It is an amazing feat to create the Qbit transform, because it’s lossless, but to be able to implement the Qbit form in a low-cost PC or digital signal processor, so that it is something that would be economically viable is a whole different challenge, and that’s what they’ve done,” Gerry Kaufhold, principal analyst with InStat, and a longtime watcher of QBit told Telephony. Others are not buying it. “It is curious that the Qbit method has never been exposed to the scientific and engineering community for critical evaluation,” Prof. William A. Pearlman, of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute told Barron’s. “I have never seen a peer-reviewed journal article or conference paper on the method.” Kilbank told Barron’s: “We’ve leapfrogged industry efforts by 15 years.” The company is working with NASA and expects the government agency to validate its claims. Lets see if it all really pans out.

  1. It looks like this company might have something tangible!
    http://washington.bizjournals.com/washington/stories/2005/05/02/story2.html

    Share
  2. It is a simple act to found out if Qbit can do what they say. Ask them to do it. I have yet to see any one other then Qbit, confirm their claims. Can any one say that they have seen Qbit compress ether pictures or videos at a rate of 10 to 1 on average?

    If they have the technology then I’m sure they would be happy to show it off. However if they don’t have the technology then Qbit is yet another scam compression company.

    If that is so I feel for John Scully. I wonder if John Scully has seen the technology work? I mean isn’t his name on the line.

    Share
  3. Did any one see this one?

    http://www.futureinreview.com/participants.php?galleryid=3630

    John Scully’s Qbit has a Ceo named Dan Kilbank who says lossless compression is impossible. As far as I know Zip is lossless, LZW is lossless, Huffman encoding is lossless, Arithmetic encoding is lossless, and Jpeg2000 can run in lossless mode. The impossible happens a lot I guess.

    Does any one have a link to the test results from Telcordia that Dan Kilbank talks about? I wonder if this report confirms the 10 to 1 compression that Qbit has claimed to have had.

    http://www.qbit.com/press_release/qbit_pr.01_05_2005.html

    Also he talks about compressing random data. I would love to see some numbers. If he could compress any kind of random data, then what would prevent him from compressing everything down into 1 bit? For more information on this look to this site.

    http://www.endlesscompression.com/

    Share
  4. This is a question for any one who knows. Can Qbit compres an image or video at an average rate of 10 to 1?

    If so I will like to see it. I have some sample images I would love to test on the Qbit compression tool.

    Or does any one know where I can find some bench mark values? I would be happy seeing the results of compression from Qbit selected images.

    So if any one has any information on how I could test John Scully’s Qbit compression tool please post to this site.

    Also who is this Dan Kilbank guy? Never heard of him before. Why is John Scully stooping down to using someone as unknown as Dan Kilbank for such an important company?

    Share
  5. Stop wasting your time talking about John Scully’s Qbit.
    Most of QBit development staff has already quit or is quiting.
    Qbit has no super compression. It is all a made upstory by the company’s CEO Dan Kilbank.
    If you don’t believe, then ask them to prove it.

    Share
  6. John Scully’s and Dan Kilbank’s Qbit LLC is nothing but a dream and a lie, proof of this is that all of Qbit’s lead developers have quit, along with Qbit’s VP of development.

    There compress tool can not get 10 to 1, and is no better then industary average. All Qbit has is a story.

    Share
  7. How do you know that a significant part of their development team is quitting?

    Share
  8. Qbit finaly comes forward with the truth. Here are the really numbers. Not 10 to 1 but 2 to 1. Case closed.

    http://www.qbit.com/technology/algorithms.php

    Share
  9. To any one that has been following these postings on Qbit and their z-image.

    The link in the last posting was a link to bench marks that showed that the Qbit’s z-image was not only slow but only compressed 2 to 1.

    I used the word “was”. Because Qbit has removed these benchmarks. I guess they didn’t like the fact that their z-image sucks.

    The only question remains is will some one be dumb enough to give Qbit and John Scully money for the lie that is z-image?

    Share
  10. I do knew this company, they totally are a group of cheater. I can’t believe they still exist!

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post