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Summary:

Its like VoIP minus the headaches. Covad Communications has started pushing a new VoIP solution that doesn’t need any special gear in your house. I had written about this but can’t seem to find the link. Maybe I need one of them Google boxes. A simple […]

Its like VoIP minus the headaches. Covad Communications has started pushing a new VoIP solution that doesn’t need any special gear in your house. I had written about this but can’t seem to find the link. Maybe I need one of them Google boxes. A simple phone, jacks into the plain old phone hack, and Covad does all the mumbo-jumbo in their central office. It is a local and long-distance UNE-P replacement service. This is like regular phone service, except its packetized voice. This could be the turbocharger VoIP needs. I am assuming, Covad will wholesale it to its resellers, which means Speakeasy might have this. Maybe time to port my phone # over to them finally. Also this is a big one for Nokia and Zhone, who are trying to upstage Alcatel I guess. Meanwhile, Mike gets my best headline of the day vote for : I can’ believe its not POTS VoIP.

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  1. Om, you need to justify how this is VoIP. Alternatively, if VZ packetizes my call after the Class 5 switch, is it VoIP? By the way, I said spuriously as much in my comment to FCC in Dec. 2003. At least now, us in the industry better crisply define VoIP. Otherwise all telephony will be VoIP just to get regulatory relief. (Remember your comment in podcasting about all calls being packetized somewhere.)

  2. Good point. i need to make that distinction. now unlike typical VoIp which does the analog to digital (IP) conversion at the ATA level and sends out voice traffc as packets over broadband, in this case that conversion happens in the central office at the DSLAM level and transport happens right on the backbone. Now that is VoIP to me as well. Just like i have said in the past, that since most of the international traffic is packetized, voip has been with us for long. it is not voip as in retail running over broadband connection voip, the sort vonage sells. sorry about that. i should have been more explicit. (Oops you actually listened to the podcast… )

  3. Aswath is right there. What does Covad brings that my ILEC cannot bring ? What Value added services will be available ?

  4. Covad to trial converged network

    It appears Covad will be running trial converged DSL VoIP networks in Atlanta, Denver and san Jose using equipment from Nokia and Zhone. [Press Release] In such a network, customers would have absolutely no idea they are actually using a VoIP

    COMMENT:
    AUTHOR: Aswath
    I assume that you will not call traditional PSTN is not VoIP, then please tell me your rationalization. This is not a question of “what is in a name”. Legally the UNI is at the NT box. If you look at the traffic at that box it is not VoIP; it is POTS. To say it differently, consider two CLECs. The first one offers traditional PSTN service using UNE-L facilities and its own Class 5 switch; the second is Covad reseller. Are they under the same set of regulations? That is the crux of the question. If you answer yes, then it does not matter what you call it; if you answer no, then be fully ready to anticipate that even ILECs will call themselves VoIP providers. The real news behind Covad’s announcement is that they have developed a technology that overcomes the deployment issues associated with PSTN architecture. In PSTN, Class 5 is needed in the geographical proximity of a customer. So it is very expensive to start a network – on day 1 you may have only one customer, but you need to have a switch that can handle the customer base at year n.

    COMMENT:
    AUTHOR: LDP
    Aswath is correct in that this will be considered POTS/PSTN traffic from the NID to the CO, but it will be converted to VoIP from that point on. The key points from this: – Covad or other service providers can offer advanced features – “No fuss, no muss” for the consumer to use an alternate carrier and get access to those addtional features. (Not everyone wants to install an ATA and wireless telephone systems…” – Offers a way for CLECs to once again go after the residential marketplace (I anticipate that the RBOCs will start complaining that loop prices are too low…) – Finally, from Covad’s announcement, the service is not distance-limited as is DSL, so the addressable market is much larger: “Covad adds that, unlike DSL broadband service, line-powered voice access is not distance-sensitive, which means Covad’s network someday will serve 40 percent more customers with basic voice services.” This should be raising a few eyebrows at the RBOCs.

  5. VoIP is not VoIP is not VoIP

    A few days back, there was a discussion as to whether Covad痴 Line Powered Voice is VoIP or PSTN. But in a short order, there was a general agreement (comments to Om’s entry, Om, Phoneboy and Andy) that it is…

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