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The New York Times:: The incipient rise of Firefox, some analysts say, points to an inherent weakness in a fundamental Microsoft business strategy: tying more and more products and features to its monopoly product, the Windows operating system. Internet Explorer is tightly bound to Windows, a […]

The New York Times:: The incipient rise of Firefox, some analysts say, points to an inherent weakness in a fundamental Microsoft business strategy: tying more and more products and features to its monopoly product, the Windows operating system. Internet Explorer is tightly bound to Windows, a move that Microsoft says improves the browser’s performance.

  1. yeah it obviously also improves the browser’s ability to be a dangerous backdoor to the deepest levels of the operating system (See link on my name)

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  2. funny as it may seem but this was the real point of the whole story and it was completely buried. i guess the whole story was sexier. anyway i thinking tyoing too many things to one OS is a bit of a problem for Microsoft.

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  3. Agreed. One of my bigger gripes with Windows is that, to this day, users perform routine system upgrades by pointing their *browser* to windowsupdate.microsoft.com. Once there, as far as a typical user will understand, the *browser* performs the operating system upgrade. I find this a very very bad thing to get users accustomed to. Try to get them to NOT click “Yes” on every ActiveX dialog they see after that. Pwah.

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