Summary:

Each year Popular Science magazine names the 100 top technical innovations for the year in their big December issue.  Their awards are given in 12 different categories including Computing, Engineering, Gadgets, and a few others.  They recently announced the grand award winners in each category and […]

Each year Popular Science magazine names the 100 top technical innovations for the year in their big December issue.  Their awards are given in 12 different categories including Computing, Engineering, Gadgets, and a few others.  They recently announced the grand award winners in each category and have listed a few of them in their press release.

I find a few of the awards surprising to say the least but then I’m not an editor on the magazine.  Easily the most questionable award is in the Gadgets category:

GADGETS: MICROSOFT WINDOWS MEDIA DRM 10

Digital Rights Management rules encoded in files restrict the number of times you can copy tracks from online music or movie services, and you have to be at your computer to listen or watch. DRM 10 frees up subscription content so you can put it on a portable device while maintaining copyright protections.

Maybe it’s just me but that award in that particular category sure makes me wonder what companies are on the magazine’s advertisers list.  For what it’s worth Webster’s defines the term gadget as:

: an often small mechanical or electronic device with a practical use but often thought of as a novelty

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