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Russell has finally realized that syncing is the most mobile application, so what if it is still an inexact science. Here’s something I’ve felt for a while now, but haven’t really figured out how to express until now. I finally just realized that it’s actually a […]

Russell has finally realized that syncing is the most mobile application, so what if it is still an inexact science.

Here’s something I’ve felt for a while now, but haven’t really figured out how to express until now. I finally just realized that it’s actually a very simple idea: Syncing is *THE* most important piece of technology in the future of mobility. Voice is and will be the number one service, but after that it’s syncing. Syncing! SYNCING! I don’t care if you *never* use your mobile for Internet data, you still want your address book backed up in case you lose your phone, right? That’s syncing.

Russ is getting Microsoft Smartphone envy, and is mad about not being able to indulge in fad-of-the-moment, aka podcasting on his Nokia 6620 cellphone. Few things, dude you are a smart software guy, so why not write your own app! Secondly have you used Microsoft smartphones. You will be using the F-word every three hours. I can sense Russ has been back in US for over a year: he is looking at the whole world through PC-tinted glasses. Microsoft’s smartphone might work out to be a big deal for a few million geeks stateside, but go to India,China, Brazil and Russia: folks there got no love for Bill & his boys!

Jonathan Greene adds his two-pfence on the subject over at his weblog

By Om Malik

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  1. Doh! “PC-tinted glasses” Oooh. Harsh. Sadly it’s true, but oh, so harsh. ;-)

    -Russ

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  2. One underrated feature of Apple’s platform is its really cool system-wide Syncing ability: iSync.

    You get that for free with your mac. Most mobile phones that tout syncing ability are compatible with Apple’s iSync. This is a direct result from Apple including syncing ability at the core of its operating system and making it easy for vendors to develop against their API.

    In the windows world right now, you’ve gotta separately purchase something like intellisync. And that works for a finite set of devices.

    Right now i’m a happy camper with the 1.25Ghz G4 powerbook with bluetooth *built-in* and the sony ericsson t610. OS X syncs calendar and addressbook to it, can also use it as a modem, or hotlink via the address book app so you get on-screen notifications with caller-ID when someone calls. Oh and everything also gets sync’ed to the ipod and online .Mac. If tomorrow I bought a Palm OS device, I could just add it to the sync chain with a couple of clicks.

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  3. Russ, thanks for taking this in good spirit. I have turned to you to keep me focused on the handset and away from the PC. So I guess I had to remind you.harsh words always work!

    Chris, I agree with you. ISync rocks. Only when it works. The # of phones that Sync with it is much lower than company likes to claim. I am still struggling with Nokia 6600!

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  4. om,

    you might want to speak with this guy: http://www.russellbeattie.com/notebook/1008086.html#1010554

    he claims that his isync works with nokia’s 6600!

    in general: i fully agree: syncing is truly important and might be an underestimated “killer app” (for the lack of a better word). isync is awesome but so is ical’s webdav sync options, .mac’s options etc. etc. i hate to say it but apple rules this one as well!

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