Summary:

Jeff Nolan blogs Q&A with Mike Volpi of Cisco. It was a chat that happened at Vortex. Only the highlights quoted here: Q: what is Cisco’s strategy to Huawei? A: whether it’s Huawei or anyone else, we do a better job of creating value on top […]

Jeff Nolan blogs Q&A with Mike Volpi of Cisco. It was a chat that happened at Vortex. Only the highlights quoted here:

Q: what is Cisco’s strategy to Huawei?
A: whether it’s Huawei or anyone else, we do a better job of creating value on top of hardware. Innovation keeps us ahead of the pack, but it’s consulting that enables us to guide customers to achieving more value out of commodity hardware
Q: what value are you adding above the router?
A: we started with a network who’s sole job was to move data around, it’s a relatively dumb mechanism. Where we are today is building a network that enables customers and ISV’s to build applications (in essence this is what Moore was referring to earlier when he said that the internet is the new application bus).
Q: what happens when you cross networks
A: even with today’s technologies dual mode phones are available. WiMax is more universal.
Q: Is Microsoft a competitor
A: not in routers, but they do want to keep the network as a commodity with little value add. It’s like having a car with all kinds of fancy technology but still on crummy roads.

Cisco has joined the WiMAX FUD, and is really freaking scared of Microsoft. Microsoft wants to take directory services control out of Cisco’s hands, and also wants to take security mantle away from Cisco. Interesting fight brewing?

By Om Malik

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