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Summary:

Like trying to figure out which mercenaries the Yankees will hire for the pennant race each year, speculating on PalmOne’s next move has become somewhat of a national pastime (to some, at least) since the company split from the Palm OS division last year. Even PalmOne […]

Like trying to figure out which mercenaries the Yankees will hire for the pennant race each year, speculating on PalmOne’s next move has become somewhat of a national pastime (to some, at least) since the company split from the Palm OS division last year. Even PalmOne execs themselves aren’t immune: Earlier this year, a Palm exec raised more than a few eyebrows when he popped off that the Palm OS was “not viewed internally as a religion”. Whether it was just posturing, or a hint at discussions happening behind the scenes, the comment suggested that Palm hardware would not always necessarily be wed to the Palm OS.

Now we learn that PalmOne will license Microsoft’s ActiveSync for future devices. Is a Windows Mobile-based Treo or Tungsten far behind? It’s unlikely. While the deal is a good one for both Palm and Microsoft – PalmOne gets the most popular enterprise-class email product and Microsoft gets more devices accessing Exchange data – it’s probably not a pre-cursor to a more involved love affair. If anything, it’s a response to RIMs continued dominance of all things email-related, and their recent shot at the Treo. With the release of RIM’s slick-and extremely affordable–7100t, make no mistake that PalmOne is feeling the heat.

But don’t be fooled, PalmOne is surely exploring other options. The Treo’s current, older Palm OS, certainly doesn’t feel like it was designed with a phone in mind. Spend five minutes with a Series 60 device and the shortcomings of the Palm OS for mobile phones becomes glaringly apparent. While Cobalt should address many of its predecessor’s shortcomings-no multi-tasking, etc-it’s been far too long coming. In the meantime, Symbian has been constantly tweaking its smartphone OS. A Palm-Symbian alliance would make sense, especially if PalmOne is serious on focusing on smartphones in the future.

Off the cuff, unscripted comments from maverick execs aside, the alliance between the Palm hardware and software folks already seemed uncertain. Where was PalmOne recently when PalmSource rolled out its new Cobalt operating system? They were barely involved in the announcement at all. Instead, the PalmSource focus was on new, white label phones. That’s a big departure from years past. It seems that after months of treading water, the two are finally starting to go their separate ways, which was the point of the whole split to begin with. Bottom line? Something’s up. It’s just not clear what. While we won’t see a platform switch in time for Christmas, don’t be surprised if by this time next year you’re hearing about a Symbian-based PalmOne phone…

Guest post by Matt Maier, Business 2.0′s fearless gizmo correspondent and my fellow traveler into the wireless wonderland. Matt uses six phones at a time, talks on none, takes video clips on two and when he is slowing down he double fists fizzy and fancy caffeine drinks. And oh by the way, send him a note and remind him how well the Dodgers are doing. Let him smile for a week or so more!

  1. And what if Dell licenses Cobalt for its Axim line?

    This is a major victory for palmOne, especially in its competition with BlackBerry (excellent article in B2.0 BTW).

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  2. Dell has never ruled out a Palm OS device, though they’re always coy about it. It seems unlikely that they would go with Palm though, their PocketPC devices have been solid and they offer better Wi-Fi support, something PalmSource has been slow to incorporate.

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  3. I doubt it. Having spoken to a lot of people at Nokia, I know that Nokia percieves that one of the key barriers to PDA-like functionality on Symbian is the extreme difficulty of developing applications for Symbian….

    Since a key strength of the Palm platform is the ability to quickly develop new apps (and thus fostering a larger amount of 3rd party apps), it’s doubtfull that Palm would be so stupid as to adopt Symbian. Symbian may be more geared to cell phones today, but that does not make it better for what cell phone will be in 18 months, neven mind the stability issues with some Symbian versions….

    More likely, Nokia and Palm will collaborate to make mobile connectivity a more real reality, esp. with PDA’s.

    Chris.

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  4. Microsoft, Symbian in Palm’s future?

    Palm has faced a number of challenges this year. And figuring out what their next move is anyones guess. With the news that Microsoft’s ActiveSync will be implemented in future Palm devices, this could mean that Palm is not dead…

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  5. Alianzas: Treo con Exchange

    Una de las principales debilidades para que la treo600 pueda ingresar, con mˆ°s fuerza que hoy en dia, al mercado corporativo era su falta total de integraciˆ„n con Exchange (servers de correo de Microsoft). Esto hasta ahora se hacˆ‚a via…

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