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Summary:

RIM’s recent run is ample proof that it has nailed down the wireless email pretty good. Even our friends at Techdirt are eating humble pie. They are mostly right about everything else, so they are entitled to one or two boo-boos. I am not going to […]

7100t_small.gifRIM’s recent run is ample proof that it has nailed down the wireless email pretty good. Even our friends at Techdirt are eating humble pie. They are mostly right about everything else, so they are entitled to one or two boo-boos. I am not going to hold against their otherwise excellent blog. Which is why it surprises me that companies like Good, Seven, and Visto keep trying. I don’t blame them: there are approximately 50 million mobile workers in the United States and nearly 70% of them would want wireless email, according to The Yankee Group. They came up with this 35 million number by combining the percentage of workers considered mobile professionals and field salesforce, according to the Yankee Group 2004 Corporate Wireless Survey. This is a big enough market for anyone to take a crack at – so what if they face a near impossible climb against much revered and equally loved Crackberry. Today Visto announced that it was taking a gander at the wireless email market, with its Visto Mobile 5.0, and I say good luck to them. (I do like the fact that Visto has a more open and clearly better solution – on paper. I hope to try it out soon enough and report on the results!) The problem I have with all these so called competitors is that they are focusing on the enterprise market and are too dependent on the carriers’ largesse to promote their products. My gut feeling is that most people fall in love with Crackberry as individuals and then perhaps convince their corporate masters to adopt the technology. That kind of adoption is tough to compete against. With RIM already on a massive licensing binge, it is going to be tough times for rest of the wireless email crowd.

  1. With the Microsoft/Palm Activesynch announcement you mentioned earlier today it looks like Good, Seven and Visto are toast.

    Why in the world would you buy one of these stand alone servers if MSFT will ship a native client on top of a Treo or Windows Mobile Phone?

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