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Greg Scoblete, a senior editor at TWICE Magazine has written a great piece over at Tech Central Station. VoIP In Your Hands is a great read especially if you want to think outside the box of VoIP as a cheap replacement for PSTN connection. TV Caller […]

Greg Scoblete, a senior editor at TWICE Magazine has written a great piece over at Tech Central Station. VoIP In Your Hands is a great read especially if you want to think outside the box of VoIP as a cheap replacement for PSTN connection.

TV Caller ID: Since voice data can travel on the same cable that also delivers your television (if you’re a cable TV subscriber) and Internet access, it’s not terribly difficult to route incoming phone info to your television. Cable providers that offer VoIP, such as New York-based Cablevision, are already testing TV caller ID and voicemail retrieval and could roll out the service in early 2005. This can work in a number of ways: the caller ID info could pop up on the TV screen immediately when the phone rings. If you’re immersed in the latest Sopranos and don’t want to be disturbed you could hide all but emergency calls and review your caller ID log from the couch via remote control when the show’s done (sorry Tommy Thomson, most VoIP trends are distinctly sedentary).

He also writes about Wireless VoIP, Interactive Gaming, and Videophone.

By Om Malik

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  1. In case you want to get TV caller ID for your “dying” PSTN phone, please take a look at http://shop.store.yahoo.com/shoptronics/tvmeplcadica.html. You don’t have to get the service from the cable provider. As for receiving caller id on your computer, just connect one of the extensions to your computer modem and run a telephony software. Also take a look at yesterday’s announcement from Verizon regarding their new service iobi (www.verizon.com/iobi). It looks like one does not need VoIP to receive voice mail via email.

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  2. L.O.L – this is just too funny! nice…

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  3. Since voice data can travel on the same cable that also delivers your television (if you’re a cable TV subscriber) and Internet access, it’s not terribly difficult to route incoming phone info to your television.

    This is just wrong – it forces the STB to include a cable modem in the STB and will only work with the MSOs VOIP service. Just because the cable video and internet come over the same wire, doesn’t mean that it is in a common format. The video format used by the STB isn’t TCP/IP that is used by phones. You need a cable modem to get at the IP traffic on the RF network.

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  4. I just don’t understand why Sonus doesn’t get mentioned more. They are by far leading the pack yet get very little press. They’re a very solid company, IMO.

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